Radiation Therapy, BSc (Hons)

Programme Overview
Radiation therapy involves the use of sophisticated equipment and techniques to deliver radiation precisely and accurately to patients, mainly for the treatment of cancer. Radiation therapists are important members of radiation oncology teams. They apply their professional education to deliver a sensitive and patient-centred service. Radiation therapists work within the oncology team to customise individual treatment plans for patients, and endeavour to deliver the best therapeutic result with minimum side-effects to patients. Radiation therapists also play a key role in helping patients manage side-effects and provide emotional comfort during treatment. Besides caring for patients, radiation therapists are also actively involved in other areas of healthcare such as research, education and administration.

Radiation therapy is a valued profession in many countries, including Singapore. The Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Radiation Therapy is a four-year, direct honours degree programme that prepares graduates for the role of a professional radiation therapist. It is the only radiation therapy programme among autonomous universities in Singapore. The curriculum is developed in close consultation with the radiation therapy industry to ensure relevance and graduates’ employability. The programme will be seeking accreditation by the Allied Health Professions Council (AHPC), thus enabling graduates to practise as a professional radiation therapist in Singapore.

Curriculum
The SIT Radiation Therapy programme focuses on applied learning and provides a high-quality, practice-oriented education in the following areas:

  • Health and behavioural sciences. Broad-based knowledge in health and behavioural sciences, including anatomy, physiology, patient care and safety, psychology, health systems, professionalism, interprofessional education, and change management.
     
  • Oncological and radiological science and technology. Professional knowledge in the science and technology associated with cancer treatment, including cancer biology, radiation oncology, radiation physics, radiobiology, radiation protection, radiological anatomy, dosimetry, medical imaging technology and radiation therapy technology.
     
  • Radiation therapy practice. Professional knowledge in different areas of radiation therapy practice, including radiation therapy treatment planning, simulation, delivery and post-treatment care for various body regions and systems. This component also includes an honours thesis that emphasises scientific enquiry and evidence-informed radiation therapy practice.

 

Career Opportunities
Suitably qualified radiation therapists are in high demand in Singapore. Besides working in major cancer centres in the public healthcare sector, radiation therapists also work in the private sector.

Eligibility and Exemption

SIT selects candidates for this programme using a holistic approach that considers passion and suitability for the profession, academic achievement, co-curricular involvement and medical clearance. Short-listed candidates will be invited for Multiple-Mini Interviews, consisting of different stations which assess different important attributes such as communication skills.

Listed below are the relevant admission criteria:

A-Level Prerequisites:

  • Obtained a good pass in two of the following H2 subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. And also offered General Paper (GP) or Knowledge & Inquiry (KI) in the same sitting while satisfying the Mother Tongue (MTL) requirements.

Diploma Prerequisites:

  • Completed a relevant full-time local Polytechnic diploma. For the detailed list, please refer to Relevant List of Diplomas.
  • Module exemptions will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
  • Diplomas that are not listed may be considered on a case-by-case basis. Applicants will be assessed for admissions based on a holistic approach and if they meet the following criteria:
    • Obtained a Science/Engineering/IT-related full-time local Polytechnic diploma and/or
    • Has acquired relevant full-time work experience of 1-2 years.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Prerequisites:

  • Obtained a good pass in two of the following: HL Biology, HL Chemistry, HL Physics and HL Mathematics; and one Standard Level (SL) subject while satisfying the Mother Tongue (MTL) requirements.

NUS High School Diploma Prerequisites:

  • A good pass in two of the following: Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics.

Mandatory English Requirement:

Applicants to the four Allied Health Programmes are required to fulfil ONE of the following English requirements by application closing:

Qualification

English Subject

Minimum Grade Required

GCE 'O' Level

English as First Language

C5

IELTS

IELTS

7.0

Polytechnic Foundation Programme (PFP)

English Modules

C+

GCE A Level

General Paper/Knowledge & Inquiry

D

International Baccalaureate (IB)

SL ‘English A: Language & Literature’ OR

SL ‘Literature & Performance’

4

NUS High School Diploma

EL4101 or higher (EL5101, 6103) modules

C+

Please refer to the Mandatory Medical Clearance for additional requirements.
Shortlisted applicants will be required to sit for a Multiple Mini Interview held on one of these dates as scheduled by the administrator.

MMI dates

24 March 2018 – For NSF only

27 – 28 March 2018

2 – 3 April 2018

7 April 2018 – For NSF only

9 – 13 April 2018

14 April 2018 – For NSF only

16 – 18 April 2018

Selection shall be solely within the discretion of the University and will depend upon the number of places available in the programme.

MODULE SYNOPSIS

Year 1 (Trimester 1)
HSC1001 Anatomy and Physiology 1

The module is designed to equip students with knowledge of the structure and function of the human body and an understanding of the interrelationship among different body systems. The topics include structure and function of cell, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, blood and immune system. Gross anatomy of the limbs, pelvis and chest including general embryology and development of limbs will be covered in this module with emphasis on musculoskeletal structure and function.

HSC1003 Health Systems - Singapore's Perspectives

The World Health Organization (WHO)’s framework of a health system includes resource generation, stewardship, funding and provisioning. The goal of a health system is to improve health, respond to expectations and focus on fairness in financial contribution. In this module, the Singapore health system is described and analyzed within the WHO’s framework. Students will learn to appreciate how policies are developed, health needs identified and met, intersectoral collaborations needed and established, and services organized and evaluated. Through interprofessional studies, they will learn about the needs of patients and the roles of different professions in the health systems addressing those needs.

HSC1004 Psychological and Sociological Perspectives for Health Sciences

Psychology is the scientific study of the mind and behaviour. In this module students will attain an understanding of key psychological concepts. Students will appreciate how psychological theories and research relate to health, illness, and healthcare. Sociology is the study of society, relationships, and social behaviour. Students will consider key sociological concepts and research to broaden their understanding of health, illness, and healthcare as they relate to the individual, family, and society.

HSC1101 Patient Care and Safety

Foundation concepts and competencies in assessment and evaluation of the patient for service delivery. Psychological and physical needs of the patient and family and factors affecting treatment outcome. Infection control procedures, routine and emergency care procedures. Role in patient education. Human factors, quality assurance.

Communication in patient care. Health-illness continuum, developing professional attitudes, communication (including interviewing, observation and recording), age- and generation-specific communication, psychological considerations. Patient-family interactions. Patient identification, aspects of treatment procedures, holistic approaches to family members and friends.

Patient rights and responsibilities (including confidentiality). Patient transfer. Body mechanics, movement techniques, fall prevention, patient positions, patient safety and immobilization methods, incident reports. Assessment of physical needs. Physical needs of the patient, assessing patient status, physical signs, vital signs, weight, laboratory values, patient chart. Patient examination. Initial assessment, records, general physical examination, selected examinations and procedures, associated equipment and instruments. Care of patients with tubes, lines, catheters and other devices. Purpose, types and special precautions, procedures and special precautions. Patient education. Needs assessment, educational methods, implementation and evaluation, treatment procedures, medical imaging procedures, documentation.

Infection control. Cycle of infection, prevention of transmission, medical and surgical asepsis, practical asepsis, isolation techniques and communicable diseases, procedures for isolation patient, precautions for the compromised patient (reverse isolation). Environmental and workplace safety.

Medications and administration. Role of the radiographer and radiation therapist, medication information, medication administration.

Medical emergencies. Emergency equipment, latex reactions, shock, signs and symptoms and medical intervention for selected emergencies. Basic cardiac life support.

Foundation concepts and competencies in assessment and evaluation of the patient for service delivery. Psychological and physical needs of the patient and family and factors affecting treatment outcome. Infection control procedures, routine and emergency care procedures. Role in patient education. Human factors, quality assurance.

Communication in patient care. Health-illness continuum, developing professional attitudes, communication (including interviewing, observation and recording), age- and generation-specific communication, psychological considerations. Patient-family interactions. Patient identification, aspects of treatment procedures, holistic approaches to family members and friends.

Patient rights and responsibilities (including confidentiality). Patient transfer. Body mechanics, movement techniques, fall prevention, patient positions, patient safety and immobilization methods, incident reports. Assessment of physical needs. Physical needs of the patient, assessing patient status, physical signs, vital signs, weight, laboratory values, patient chart. Patient examination. Initial assessment, records, general physical examination, selected examinations and procedures, associated equipment and instruments. Care of patients with tubes, lines, catheters and other devices. Purpose, types and special precautions, procedures and special precautions. Patient education. Needs assessment, educational methods, implementation and evaluation, treatment procedures, medical imaging procedures, documentation.

Infection control. Cycle of infection, prevention of transmission, medical and surgical asepsis, practical asepsis, isolation techniques and communicable diseases, procedures for isolation patient, precautions for the compromised patient (reverse isolation). Environmental and workplace safety.

Medications and administration. Role of the radiographer and radiation therapist, medication information, medication administration.

Medical emergencies. Emergency equipment, latex reactions, shock, signs and symptoms and medical intervention for selected emergencies. Basic cardiac life support.

Foundation concepts and competencies in assessment and evaluation of the patient for service delivery. Psychological and physical needs of the patient and family and factors affecting treatment outcome. Infection control procedures, routine and emergency care procedures. Role in patient education. Human factors, quality assurance.

Communication in patient care. Health-illness continuum, developing professional attitudes, communication (including interviewing, observation and recording), age- and generation-specific communication, psychological considerations. Patient-family interactions. Patient identification, aspects of treatment procedures, holistic approaches to family members and friends.

Patient rights and responsibilities (including confidentiality). Patient transfer. Body mechanics, movement techniques, fall prevention, patient positions, patient safety and immobilization methods, incident reports. Assessment of physical needs. Physical needs of the patient, assessing patient status, physical signs, vital signs, weight, laboratory values, patient chart. Patient examination. Initial assessment, records, general physical examination, selected examinations and procedures, associated equipment and instruments. Care of patients with tubes, lines, catheters and other devices. Purpose, types and special precautions, procedures and special precautions. Patient education. Needs assessment, educational methods, implementation and evaluation, treatment procedures, medical imaging procedures, documentation.

Infection control. Cycle of infection, prevention of transmission, medical and surgical asepsis, practical asepsis, isolation techniques and communicable diseases, procedures for isolation patient, precautions for the compromised patient (reverse isolation). Environmental and workplace safety.

Medications and administration. Role of the radiographer and radiation therapist, medication information, medication administration.

Medical emergencies. Emergency equipment, latex reactions, shock, signs and symptoms and medical intervention for selected emergencies. Basic cardiac life support.

Year 1 (Trimester 2)
HSC1002 Anatomy and Physiology 2

This module extends the knowledge gained in Anatomy and Physiology 1, and includes structures and functions of the endocrine system, gastrointestinal tract, renal system and the reproductive system. Gross anatomy of the spine (cervical, thoracic and lumbar) and neurocranium (skull) will be covered in this module with emphasis on the musculoskeletal structures and functions of the spinal vertebrae.

HSC1102 Radiation Physics and Dosimetry

This module provides the foundation physics knowledge relevant to medical radiation and imaging. Topics include the structure of matter, properties of radiation, radioactivity and decay, and interactions of ionizing radiation with matter. This module also segues into x-ray instrumentation by introducing x-ray production.

HSC1105 Principles of Radiographic Practice

This module focuses on the science and equipment involved in the production of optimal radiographic images. It follows the x-ray beam from creation to detection and image formation. It also discusses factors affecting image quality, optimal imaging standards, problem-solving techniques for image evaluation, and quality assurance. These principles are then extended to discuss principles of operation of equipment for fluoroscopy, mobile radiography and angiography.

HSC1005 Research - Critical Appraisal of Literature

The module will introduce the quantitative and qualitative methodologies in conducting research in the healthcare industry. The module will cover the common types of research design. By relating to scientific literature, different topics such as sampling, generalizability, blinding, effect size, randomization will be introduce weekly. Alongside introducing the basic methodology, this module focuses on getting students search for evidence in the literature from the different database. It aims to develop skills in searching for evidence, understanding research articles and ability to critically appraise published literature. Part the module will also focus on preparing students on academic writing, alongside working on the critical appraisal of literature.

Year 1 (Trimester 3)
RTY1001 Principles of Radiation Therapy Practice

Professional roles and responsibilities to patients, community, profession and self (including radiation, legal and ethical practice, diversity). Scope of practice, practice standards, code of ethics. Incidence, etiology and epidemiology. Carcinogenesis. Theories and prevention. Detection and diagnosis. Medical history, physical examination, biopsy, microscopy, laboratory, diagnostic imaging studies. Early detection, screening programs. Grading and staging. Definitions, purpose, methods, effect on treatment. Prognostic factors. Tumour-related, host-related. Treatment intent (radical, adjuvant, palliative). Treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, hormonal, radionuclide therapies, gene manipulation, complementary therapies). Principles and modalities of radiation therapy treatment (external beam radiation, brachytherapy, hyperthermia). Research.

Key terms. Radiation therapy equipment, equipment components and terms, dose delivery terms, positioning terms.

Factors that influence and govern clinical planning of patient treatment. Isodose descriptions, patient contouring, radiobiologic considerations, dosimetric calculations, compensation and clinical application of treatment beams. Nomenclature and terminology, treatment sheet documentation, technical skills and land-marking, palliative treatment techniques. Staging and planning. Treatment planning principles, treatment planning system algorithms, planning techniques. Imaging for diagnosis, digital imaging and PACS.

General care of the cancer patient. Cancer patients and grief.

RTY1901 Radiation Therapy Clinical Practice 1

TBC

Year 2 (Trimester 1)
RTY2003 Radiation Therapy Physics

Expand upon areas of radiation physics specific to radiation therapy. Nuclear transformations and interactions of ionizing radiation. Treatment units used in external radiation therapy. Measurement and quality of ionizing radiation produced. Absorbed dose measurement, dose distribution and scatter analysis.

Nuclear transformations. Mean life, radioactive series, radioactive equilibrium, modes of decay, decay equations and problems, nuclear reactions, activation of nuclides, nuclear reactors, and charged particle accelerators.

Interactions of ionizing radiation. Photon beam attenuation, interaction of charged particles, interaction of neutrons, and overview of comparative beam characteristics.

Radiation therapy treatment units. Contact, superficial, orthovoltage or deep therapy, megavoltage therapy, linear accelerator, cyclotron, synchrotron, particle beams, isotope beams.

Measurement of ionizing radiation. Unit of exposure, collection of charge instruments, electrometers, special chambers, environmental conditions, measurement of exposure.

Quality of ionizing radiation. Energy fluence, clinically practical expression of beam quality, filters, measurement of beam quality parameters, measurement of megavoltage beam energy, measurement of energy spectrum.

Measurement of absorbed dose. Radiation absorbed dose, relationship between KERMA, exposure and absorbed dose, calculation of absorbed dose from exposure, Bragg-Gray cavity theory, calibration of megavoltage beams, other methods of measurement of absorbed dose, Monte Carlo methods.

Dose distribution and scatter analysis. Phantoms, depth dose distribution, percentage depth dose, tissue-air ratio, backscatter factor, scatter-air ratio (SAR).

HSC1103 Radiobiology and Radiation Protection

Principles of radiation biology. Interactions of radiation with molecules, cells, tissues and body and resultant biophysical events. Factors affecting biological response, including acute and chronic effects of radiation.

Principles of radiation protection and safety for medical radiation professionals. Radiation health and safety requirements of regulatory agencies, accreditation agencies and health care organizations are incorporated.

Introductory cell biology, types of ionizing radiation, sources of medical radiation exposure, specification of radiation quantities, molecular effects of radiation, factors effecting energy transfer, sub-cellular and cellular radiation effects, somatic, genetic and embryonic radiation effects, factors influencing radiation response. Law of Bergonié and Tribondeau, cell survival and recovery, systemic response to radiation, total body irradiation, radiation dose response curves, late effects of radiation, risk estimates.

Justification for radiation protection, potential biological damage of ionizing radiation, dose limits, ALARA, comparable risk, negligible individual dose, sources of radiation, legal and ethical responsibilities. Radiation units of exposure, dose and radioactivity, dose equivalent, radiation detectors. General survey procedures, equipment survey, area survey, regulatory and advisory agencies, radiation safety officer. Requirements for personnel monitoring, methods and types of personnel monitors, records of accumulated dose, effective dose limits, responsibility for radiation protection. Radiation protection design, regulation and advisory recommendations, cardinal principles in protection, emergency procedures. Patient protection.

RTY2005 Radiation Oncology (Breast, Genitourinary & Gynaecological)

Series of modules covering the science and clinical management of malignancies of the breast, central nervous, digestive, endocrine, head and neck, hematopoietic, integumentary, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

Pathophysiology. Etiology, histopathology, pathogenesis, mechanism and pattern of spread, invasion and metastasis. Mechanism of action of cancer drugs, development of resistance. Interaction of cancer treatments with normal and malignant tissues.

Clinical management. Epidemiology, presenting symptoms. Diagnosis, medical history, clinical assessment, biopsy, laboratory tests, imaging methods. Staging, grading. Treatment and prognostic factors, adjuvant therapy. Acute and late side effects of cancer treatment. Quality of life. Survival and follow up.

Appearance of diseased anatomical structures on a variety of imaging formats. Topographic and sectional anatomy (CT, MRI and other imaging modalities). Image evaluation, viewing and critique.

RTY2001 Cancer Pathology

Develop broad understanding of the pathological basis of human disease, and understanding of patho-genetic mechanisms underlying neoplasia. Concepts and classification of disease. Responses to injury. Healing and repair. Inflammation. Immune responses. Abnormal growth. Neoplasia. Inflammation, hormones and growth factors related to oncology. Regulation of cell cycle. Cancer pathology. Viral carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis.

Year 2 (Trimester 2)
HSC2001 Pathophysiology and Pharmacology

This module introduces students to the broad categories of diseases and injuries from a systems approach. The students learn the contemporary knowledge and perspectives on the pathological and abnormal physiological processes that lead to these diseases and injuries, current medical interventions, including surgery and drugs, and associated complications either arising from the disease processes or medical interventions. Students learn the effects of drugs on the biological systems (for instance, interactions between chemicals and biological receptors) and the effects of biological systems on drugs (that is, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals from biological systems). In addition, students learn to recognize the desired and undesired effects of medication, delivery options, adverse drug reactions that health professionals may observe. The specific roles of these health professionals in communicating adverse reactions and requesting modification in medication delivery to optimize performance and minimize pain will also be discussed.

HSC1104 Radiological and Cross-Sectional Anatomy

Review of normal surface and gross anatomical relationships and organisation. Location and identification of gross anatomical structures in transverse, sagittal and coronal planes. Sectional anatomy of normal anatomical structures and normal variants of the head, brain and neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, spine, musculoskeletal on plain and contrast radiographic, CT and MR images.

RTY2004 Principles of Radiation Therapy Practice (Breast, Genitourinary & Gynaecological)

Series of modules covering the practice of radiation therapy for malignancies of the breast, central nervous, digestive, endocrine, head and neck, hematopoietic, integumentary, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

Planning (including deformation registration, image fusion, 2D, 3D, IMRT, VMAT planning, ICRU report interpretation, treatment plan analysis and evaluation, 4D planning, adaptive RT). Radiation positioning and immobilisation (including positioning, immobilisation, treatment delivery accessories).

Localisation and verification (including simulation, MRI/CT/PET localisation, pre-treatment verification protocol).

Patient care and management (including assessment of side effects, assessment of pain or other physical needs; patient examination, assessment of nutritional status, patient education, care of patient undergoing RT).

 

RTY2902 Radiation Therapy Clinical Practice 2

TBC

Year 3 (Trimester 1)
HSC2002 Research - Methods and Statistics

More advance research methodologies will be introduced in the module. There will be introduction to a range of statistical methods for health scientists including regression and analysis of variance. The students will be introduced to more complex forms of study designs (e.g. mixed methods design), will be taught how to relate skills of critical appraisal to statistical analysis.

RTY3001 Principles of Radiation Therapy Practice (Respiratory, Endocrine & CNS)

Series of modules covering the practice of radiation therapy for malignancies of the breast, central nervous, digestive, endocrine, head and neck, hematopoietic, integumentary, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

Planning (including deformation registration, image fusion, 2D, 3D, IMRT, VMAT planning, ICRU report interpretation, treatment plan analysis and evaluation, 4D planning, adaptive RT). Radiation positioning and immobilisation (including positioning, immobilisation, treatment delivery accessories).

Localisation and verification (including simulation, MRI/CT/PET localisation, pre-treatment verification protocol).

Patient care and management (including assessment of side effects, assessment of pain or other physical needs; patient examination, assessment of nutritional status, patient education, care of patient undergoing RT).

RTY3002 Radiation Oncology (Respiratory, Endocrine & CNS)

Series of modules covering the science and clinical management of malignancies of the breast, central nervous, digestive, endocrine, head and neck, hematopoietic, integumentary, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

Pathophysiology. Etiology, histopathology, pathogenesis, mechanism and pattern of spread, invasion and metastasis. Mechanism of action of cancer drugs, development of resistance. Interaction of cancer treatments with normal and malignant tissues.

Clinical management. Epidemiology, presenting symptoms. Diagnosis, medical history, clinical assessment, biopsy, laboratory tests, imaging methods. Staging, grading. Treatment and prognostic factors, adjuvant therapy. Acute and late side effects of cancer treatment. Quality of life. Survival and follow up.

Appearance of diseased anatomical structures on a variety of imaging formats. Topographic and sectional anatomy (CT, MRI and other imaging modalities). Image evaluation, viewing and critique.

RTY3903 Radiation Therapy Clinical Practice 3

TBC

Year 3 (Trimester 2)
RTY3003 Principles of Radiation Therapy Practice (Head & Neck, Paediatric & Lymphomas)

Series of modules covering the practice of radiation therapy for malignancies of the breast, central nervous, digestive, endocrine, head and neck, hematopoietic, integumentary, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

Planning (including deformation registration, image fusion, 2D, 3D, IMRT, VMAT planning, ICRU report interpretation, treatment plan analysis and evaluation, 4D planning, adaptive RT).

Radiation positioning and immobilisation (including positioning, immobilisation, treatment delivery accessories).

Localisation and verification (including simulation, MRI/CT/PET localisation, pre-treatment verification protocol).

Patient care and management (including assessment of side effects, assessment of pain or other physical needs; patient examination, assessment of nutritional status, patient education, care of patient undergoing RT).

RTY3004 Radiation Oncology (Head & Neck, Paediatric & Lymphomas)

Series of modules covering the science and clinical management of malignancies of the breast, central nervous, digestive, endocrine, head and neck, hematopoietic, integumentary, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

Pathophysiology. Etiology, histopathology, pathogenesis, mechanism and pattern of spread, invasion and metastasis. Mechanism of action of cancer drugs, development of resistance. Interaction of cancer treatments with normal and malignant tissues.

Clinical management. Epidemiology, presenting symptoms. Diagnosis, medical history, clinical assessment, biopsy, laboratory tests, imaging methods. Staging, grading. Treatment and prognostic factors, adjuvant therapy. Acute and late side effects of cancer treatment. Quality of life. Survival and follow up.

Appearance of diseased anatomical structures on a variety of imaging formats. Topographic and sectional anatomy (CT, MRI and other imaging modalities). Image evaluation, viewing and critique.

RTY3801 Honours Thesis Proposal

TBC

RTY3904 Radiation Therapy Clinical Practice 4

TBC

Year 3 (Trimester 3)
HSC3001 Change Management

Through this module, students will develop understanding related to the challenges and opportunities presented by changes in science, technology, society and organisations. Popular narratives related to the disciplines of science and technology often frame these disciplines as both providing and based upon absolute truth, and formed through singular evolutions. Such narratives present current advancements in science and technology as unproblematic and inevitable processes of evolution. These narratives often fail to take into account alternative narratives and social, political and cultural reasons for the changes, and as such present the reader a view that is at best static and at worst prejudiced. In recent years, scholars have repeatedly demonstrated that science and technology are as fluid and malleable as the people who produce them. Through a focus on themes of “Social Change”, “Organizational Change” and “Individual Change”, the students will develop understanding of how change occurs, why it occurs, and what we can do to anticipate, encourage and manage change. Students will think about and discuss a range of benefits that managing and understanding change may contribute to their lives, the organizations in which they work and society as a whole. Organisational change theories, and concepts regarding resistance to change will be introduced and discussed. Students will develop knowledge of individual change. Through exploring individuals’ strengths and concepts of occupational identity, students will identify individual coping mechanisms that may be employed when dealing with change. Students will discuss the potential ways of becoming a change agent for an organization and society. The students will learn about being a recipient of change as well as an agent / future leader for change.

RTY4801 Honours Thesis

The aim of the module is to facilitate the students to actively participate in a research process, and in so doing understand the theoretical and practical aspects of research. The module aims to develop a solid appreciation of the value of research in clinical practice. It aims to encourage ongoing critical evaluation in clinical practice.

Elective

TBC

Year 4 (Trimester 1)
RTY4001 Principles of Radiation Therapy Practice (Systemic Diseases & Oncologic Emergencies)

Series of modules covering the practice of radiation therapy for malignancies of the breast, central nervous, digestive, endocrine, head and neck, hematopoietic, integumentary, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

Planning (including deformation registration, image fusion, 2D, 3D, IMRT, VMAT planning, ICRU report interpretation, treatment plan analysis and evaluation, 4D planning, adaptive RT). Radiation positioning and immobilisation (including positioning, immobilisation, treatment delivery accessories).

Localisation and verification (including simulation, MRI/CT/PET localisation, pre-treatment verification protocol).

Patient care and management (including assessment of side effects, assessment of pain or other physical needs; patient examination, assessment of nutritional status, patient education, care of patient undergoing RT).

RTY4002 Radiation Oncology (Systemic Diseases & Oncologic Emergencies)

Series of modules covering the science and clinical management of malignancies of the breast, central nervous, digestive, endocrine, head and neck, hematopoietic, integumentary, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems.

Pathophysiology. Etiology, histopathology, pathogenesis, mechanism and pattern of spread, invasion and metastasis. Mechanism of action of cancer drugs, development of resistance. Interaction of cancer treatments with normal and malignant tissues.

Clinical management. Epidemiology, presenting symptoms. Diagnosis, medical history, clinical assessment, biopsy, laboratory tests, imaging methods. Staging, grading. Treatment and prognostic factors, adjuvant therapy. Acute and late side effects of cancer treatment. Quality of life. Survival and follow up.

Appearance of diseased anatomical structures on a variety of imaging formats. Topographic and sectional anatomy (CT, MRI and other imaging modalities). Image evaluation, viewing and critique.

RTY4801 Honours Thesis

The aim of the module is to facilitate the students to actively participate in a research process, and in so doing understand the theoretical and practical aspects of research. The module aims to develop a solid appreciation of the value of research in clinical practice. It aims to encourage ongoing critical evaluation in clinical practice.

RTY4905 Radiation Therapy Clinical Practice 5

TBC

Year 4 (Trimester 2)
HSC3002 Professionalism, Ethics and Legal Aspects of Healthcare

This module explores the conceptualization of professionalism of the health professionals with respect to identity, the work they perform and autonomy. Both occupational and organizational professionalism will be discussed in the context of the new public managerialism. Besides developing theoretical foundation on understanding professionalism, representatives from the respective health professional associations and bodies will be invited to share with students the importance of membership with professional associations and their advocacy work. Students learn various ethical theories from both the West and the East, and incorporate these in case-based learning activities that also stimulate and chart their moral development. Pertinent healthcare laws locally as they relate to the professional and ethical conduct of health care professionals as well as health services provision will be integrated throughout the module. This module is intended for students from various health sciences disciplines so that interprofessional learning about professional and ethical issues can be achieved.

HSC4001 Health Systems - Global Perspectives

This module provides the opportunity for students to expand their knowledge and understanding of contemporary global health issues. The major challenges in global health will be discussed and the management of such addressed. The main focus will be on the four main non-communicable diseases: cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic lung disease and diabetes which lead to death in three in five people worldwide. The overall aim is to broaden perspectives on health services development, provisioning and delivery, as well as factors that contribute to strengthening the health systems of developing and developed countries.

HSC4002 Interprofessional and Professional Issues for Entry into Practice

This module aims to prepare students with the concept of Professional & Inter-professional education (IPE), to provide patient care in a collaborative team environment. In Inter-professional Education students will work in small interdisciplinary groups designed to model working professional teams. The emphasis is on developing an understanding of other disciplines’ roles and improving awareness of how effective teamwork and communication may benefit the care of patients with chronic diseases. Through this module, students will be well-prepared to enter collaborative practice inter-professional partnerships for the optimization of patient health outcomes.

RTY4801 Honours Thesis

The aim of the module is to facilitate the students to actively participate in a research process, and in so doing understand the theoretical and practical aspects of research. The module aims to develop a solid appreciation of the value of research in clinical practice. It aims to encourage ongoing critical evaluation in clinical practice.

RTY4003 Advances in Radiation Therapy

Brachytherapy, proton therapy, total body irradiation, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, emerging treatments.

Campus Location
SIT@Dover
SIT@Dover

10 Dover Drive
Singapore 138683