Civil Engineering

Civil Engineering

Programme Overview

The Bachelor of Engineering with Honours in Civil Engineering is a three-year direct honours degree programme jointly offered by SIT and the University of Glasgow (UofG). This programme will play an important role in addressing the lack of local graduate manpower with the necessary civil engineering professional qualifications for the building and construction industry in the face of sustained building and infrastructure development.

Through a heavy emphasis on project-based learning and industrial immersion, this programme aims to produce industry-ready graduates who are equipped with a high level of technical expertise to address multidisciplinary challenges, provide technically sound, economically feasible and sustainable solutions to complex problems.

The Programme Educational Objectives

The Programme Educational Objectives of the Bachelor of Engineering with Honours and Master of Engineering Technology programmes aim to produce work-ready graduates armed with the following:

  • To be technically competent and industry-ready for a successful career in the civil engineering profession.
  • To acquire analytical, problem-solving and lifelong learning skills to manage civil engineering projects in a rapidly changing world.
  • To address multidisciplinary challenges and to provide technically sound, economically feasible and sustainable solutions.
  • To lead in their profession, community and public service with effective communication, high ethical, and professional standards.

Upon successful completion of this programme, students may continue with the Master of Engineering Technology in Civil Engineering graduate degree that will qualify them to apply to sit for the professional examination, conducted by the Professional Engineers Board of Singapore. They may take the exam immediately upon completion of their bachelor degree or gain some relevant working experience before coming back to pursue the Master of Engineering Technology degree later. In this way, they can study at a pace that best suits their individual needs and abilities. A strong emphasis is placed on the industrial relevance in the curriculum development of Bachelor of Engineering with Honours and Master of Engineering Technology programmes in consultation with government agencies and companies from the construction sector.

Students will acquire deep specialist training at the Master of Engineering Technology level which consists of five compulsory core modules and five selected modules taught at an advanced graduate level depending on the area of specialisation in Structural Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering or Rail Engineering.

Programme Highlights

  • Professional degrees to be accredited by EAB Singapore
  • Flexible Bachelor of Engineering with Honours Degree Programme
  • Transferable ECTS Credits
  • 3-week Overseas Immersion Programme in Glasgow
  • 8-month Integrated Work Study Programme in Industry

Eligibility and Exemption

Diploma holders from any local polytechnic and A-Level graduates are welcome to apply.

Holders of BCA Academy Diploma in Construction Engineering are eligible to apply.

Subject to approval, diploma applicants may be granted module exemptions, based on the modules taken during their diploma.

Integrating Work and Study

Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP)
Students will undergo an six to 12-month continuous structured learning and work programme in the construction industry that exposes them to both design office and field/site supervision experience. The learning experience is more structured than an internship, with objectives and corresponding assessments in career and professional skills, integration of knowledge and practice, and innovation skills. In addition, the Capstone Project is embedded within the IWSP, and students will start to formalise and propose their projects during the first semester of IWSP with input from their industrial supervisors.

Field/site supervision experience is mandatory for professional registration and this experience can contribute to the recognition of work experience required for registration as a resident engineer with IES/ACES.

Overseas Immersion Programme (OIP)
Students will participate in an intensive three-week Overseas Immersion Programme (OIP) at the home campus of the University of Glasgow where they get to experience life as a student in Glasgow, United Kingdom. The programme itinerary includes library and career talks, academic lectures, research and literature review workshops to prepare students for their final-year dissertation projects, as well as visits to companies, museums and key cultural sites.

The group project-based subjects covering both the conceptual and detailed aspects of design will be carried out during the OIP, involving different areas of the civil engineering discipline such as ground investigation, planning, transportation design, social, foundation design, structural design, and buildability of the construction.

MODULE SYNOPSIS

Year 1 Trimester 1
CVE1111 Engineering Mathematics 1

The module is an introduction to the Calculus, usually referred to as Single-Variable Calculus. The module commences with a review of the concept of functions with an emphasis on the transcendental functions (i.e. trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions). Thereafter, the basic concepts of limits, differentiation and integration are introduced followed by applications of the differential and integral calculus. The module ends with an introduction to modelling physical problems using first-order differential equations and an analysis of infinite series. Collectively, these foundational mathematics topics will prepare students adequately for the other modules encountered in the first two trimesters and pave the way for Engineering Mathematics 2.

CVE1112 Engineering Physics

The module is an introduction to the fundamentals of Newtonian Physics. Topics covered include kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, energy principles, impulse and collisions and dynamics of rotational motion. This module lays the conceptual foundation for the more specialised modules in Fluid Mechanics and Soil Mechanics encountered in Year 1. The module also employs Pearson MasteringPhysicsTM for administering online tutorials. The system tracks a student’s performance and activity in real-time and personalises content to reinforce concepts that target each student's particular strengths and weaknesses.

CVE1113 Civil Engineering Skills

This module provides the foundation for civil engineering skills including computing and surveying. The first part of the module introduces students to basic measurement techniques and skills needed in engineering works to control and map interpretation. The second part of the module provides an introduction to basic programming techniques with applications in the engineering context, implemented in the popular scripting language MATLAB.

CVE1121 Statics and Structural Mechanics

This module provides the fundamental concepts of statics and structural mechanics and their applications in engineering problems. The module emphasizes the ability to tackle real engineering mechanics problems by constructing and solving mathematical models based on the principle of equilibrium. Part 1 deals with concepts such as forces, moment of forces, resultants, equilibrium and friction and these will be applied to solid mechanics problems, such as cable-pulley systems, trusses and beams. Part 2 Topics include the mechanical properties of materials, stresses and strains of a body subjected to external loads, apply the principles of engineering mechanics to determine elastic behaviour of members and components subjected to bending moment, shear force, axial force, torque, and combined loading. This module forms an essential technical basis for the analysis and design of civil structures

CVE1181 Civil Engineering and Sustainable Built Environment

An overview of the contributions made by civil engineering towards civilisation will be taught to enable students to better understand the civil engineer’s role in society at large. The built environment encompassing infrastructures such as airports, buildings, bridges, flyovers, tunnels, underground spaces, roads, railroads, waterways, water supply systems, wastewater collection and treatment systems, and solid waste disposal will be highlighted. While civil engineering has contributed to the good of mankind, students will be exposed to the environmental impact of civil engineering activities and be equipped to use the environmental management system as a framework to develop programs that will help minimise harmful impacts to our environment. Examples of integrated/holistic solutions to climate change that influence urban planning for sustainable development in the Singapore context will be discussed. As part of the training for practice-oriented civil engineers, students will also be exposed to create prototypes via 3R hands-on workshops in The Catalyst - a makerspace to turn ideas-into-action.

Year 1 Trimester 2
CVE1221 Civil Engineering Materials

This module introduces fundamentals on solid mechanics including the tensile and compressive strength, toughness, hardness and stress-strain relationship of solids. The main focus is on the characteristics of the primary construction materials used in civil engineering: cement, concrete, masonry, metals and timber. The selection and sustainability of construction materials will also be briefly discussed. There are two laboratory sessions including concrete mix casting & testing and steel tensile strength test in order to practice the knowledge learnt on the lectures. In addition, this module features two i-lab sessions during which students will visit local companies for concrete batching/testing as well as mechanical testing on metals.

CVE1231 Engineering Geology and Soil Mechanics

The objective of this module is to provide students with the fundamental knowledge of engineering geology and soil mechanics. Upon completion of the module, students should gain an understanding of engineering geology (in particular Singapore Geology), origin of soils and clay minerals, basic characteristics of soils, the fundamental effective stress principle, seepage and the mechanical behaviour of soil such as its shear strength, compressibility and consolidation properties. This module also enables students to appreciate the impact of soil mechanics on geotechnical and foundation engineering design and construction through case studies and laboratory tests. As this is an introductory module in soil mechanics, no prerequisites are required.

CVE1241 Fluid Mechanics

This is an introductory module in Fluid Mechanics that aims to introduce the basic principles of fluid statics and dynamics along with engineering properties of fluids, including the concepts of dimensional analysis, similitude and applications of the aforementioned principles to internal pipe flow problems. Students will also be introduced to pipe flow and hydraulic machinery (mainly centrifugal pumps). Students will be given the opportunity to conduct experiments in the Hydraulic Laboratory related to the use of the Energy Equation in Fluid Dynamics.

CVE1211 Engineering Mathematics 2

This module extends the basic concepts of differentiation and integration learned in Engineering Mathematics I to the calculus of functions of multiple variables, also known as Multivariable Calculus. The module commences with an introduction of the three-dimensional space together with the concept of vectors. This extends to polar coordinates and vector functions. The second part of the module covers first-order and second-order ordinary differential equations, partial differentiation and multiple integrals. Online lecture recordings are available on the module webpage. Students are required to watch the videos prior to attending each lecture.

CVE1212 Graphical Communication

The module aims to teach students the principles of engineering drawing, create typical drawings using Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) tools, create freehand sketches using the correct sketching techniques, understand the concepts of axonometric, oblique and isometric projection in engineering drawings, create isometric and oblique sketches from an actual object and given Multiview drawing create a perspective sketches from an actual object, read and interpret civil and structural engineering drawings. Computer lab sessions using AutoCAD are an integral part of this module, with total contact hours equally apportioned between the lectures and the lab sessions.

CVE1281 Effective Communication

Effective written and oral communication skills have long been viewed as core competencies for undergraduate students in major universities in the world, and they are required by employers for today’s globalized workplace. Specific communication skills required of engineering undergraduates include the ability to present academic and technical information both in writing and orally to technical and non-technical audiences. This module aims to help you develop such abilities through academic essay writing, technical report writing, reflective writing, small group discussions, oral presenting and other learning activities. CVE1281 also adopt a process-based, reading-into-writing approach so that students have the chance to learn/unlearn/relearn from the multiple drafting experience of each writing assignment. For the principle instructional focus of the module, a project-based approach is used that requires teams of students to explore authentic engineering problems and develop viable solutions within real-world contexts. Within the module, you will read discipline-specific articles, do writing assignments and a project with an engineering focus, and interview engineers or related experts, thus facilitating greater acquaintance with the field.

Year 2 Trimester 1
CVE2111 Engineering Mathematics 3

This module is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of probability and statistics covering such topics as random variables, Bayes’ theorem, Normal Distribution, Joint Distributions, Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing and linear regression. Students will have an opportunity to familiarize themselves with statistical software packages such as Excel or R in analysing practical real-world data. Online video lectures for certain topics are available on the module webpage. Students are required to watch the videos prior to attending the lectures. Knowledge of CVE1211 (Engineering Mathematics II) is mandatory.

CVE2121 Structural Analysis 1

This module presents the characteristics of the primary material types used in civil and construction engineering: steel, aluminium, aggregate, concrete, masonry, asphalt, wood, and composites. Coverage includes the basic structure of the materials, material production process, mechanistic behaviour of the material, their environmental influences, and construction considerations.

Knowledge of CVE1121 (Statics and Structural Mechanics) is mandatory.

CVE2131 Geotechnical Engineering

This module builds upon the knowledge gained in CVE1231 on Engineering Geology and Soil Mechanics and introduces students to the more advanced topics on soil strength and earth retaining structures. Upon the completion of this module, the student will be able to conduct an assessment of soil strength in drained/undrained conditions, perform calculations of active and passive earth pressures, and gain an appreciation of various important design considerations pertaining to the design of retaining structures, as well as an introduction to deep excavations.

Knowledge of CVE1231 (Engineering Geology and Soil Mechanics) is mandatory.

CVE2141 Hydraulics and Hydrology

This module presents the important concepts of hydraulics and hydrology as they are used in everyday practice in real-world applications that are relevant to civil engineering. Coverage includes topics such as the basic concepts of open channel flow including uniform, rapidly varying and gradually varied flow, surface water hydrology including the processes of the hydrological cycle, precipitation, runoff, unit hydrographs, flood forecasting using the unit hydrograph method and flood routing and groundwater hydrology including flow to a well, geophysical methods of groundwater exploration and methods of estimating recharge.

CVE2161 BIM for Civil Engineers

This module is an introduction to Building Information Modelling (BIM). BIM is an integral component of Integrated Digital Delivery (IDD) of a construction project including design, analysis, construction planning, 4D coordination, and fabrication processes. The information stored within BIM for different parties in the value chain will be explored to gain an overview of BIM modelling specific to the Civil Engineering discipline. Knowledge of BIM processes and skill in leveraging software tools will assist students in managing information and data postgraduation. Evidence of this can be demonstrated in the project portfolio developed through the course of this module. This knowledge and skill will also be critical for subsequent Design Project modules in the Civil Engineering programme.

Year 2 Trimester 2
CVE2221 Structural Analysis 2

This module builds upon the knowledge gained in the previous module CVE2121 (Structural Analysis 1) and presents the theory and applications of modern matrix structural analysis. Topics include the concept of equilibrium, compatibility and force-displacement relationship, the direct stiffness method, matrix formulation of trusses, beams and frames and computer modelling of 2D/3D truss and frame structures. This module can be seen as a precursor to the Finite Element Method. Knowledge of CVE2121 (Structural Analysis 1) is mandatory.

CVE2222 Structural Design

This module is an introduction to the EN Euro Codes. In particular, the module focuses on Eurocode 0 (Basis of Structural Design), Eurocode 1 (Actions on Structures), Eurocode 2 (Reinforced Concrete Design), and Eurocode 3 (Steel Design). This module covers following topics:
1. Basic concepts and terms of structural design;
2. Concepts of various limit state design principles;
3. Derivation of load effects under various unfavourable load combinations;
4. Understand various actions at different stages of structures. However, CVE2222 will focus on basic permanent actions and variable actions. More advanced load actions such as wind actions, thermal actions, actions during execution and accidental actions will be introduced qualitatively instead of quantitatively.
5. Students will learn reinforced concrete design for buildings using design charts and design formulae. The topics include beam design, slab design and column design.
6. Topics on steel structural design are tweaked on a more basic understanding of the various characteristics of steel structural members in a typical steel structural system for buildings.
7. Basic design calculation of steel members under tension, compression, bending and simple connections will be covered. Students will appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of adopting steel structures. More advanced topics will be taught in module CVE2223.
8. Singapore National Annex of Euro Codes for the relevant topics will be introduced for students to understand how to use and refer to the relevant design codes.
9. Structural drawing conventions and how to interpret drawings will be taught to get students better prepared for future works.

CVE2251 Environmental Engineering

An overview of general environmental engineering principles and technologies will be taught to enable students to better understand the civil engineer’s role in society. Air pollution, land pollution, noise pollution and water pollution, together with their associated quality standards will be highlighted. Students will be taught to identify pollution sources and characterise pollutants for effective pollution management and control strategy. Students will be equipped with 3R framework, treatment technologies, design principles, and alternative treatment options. Civilisation needs involving water demand, water supply systems, wastewater collection and treatment systems, NEWater, solid waste management, industrial hazardous waste management, air quality management, and noise management system will be discussed in depth.

CVE2252 Transportation Engineering

This module is an introduction to transportation systems, transportation planning and management, and traffic flow studies. The geometric design of roads and intersections will also be discussed during lectures with hands-on activities during tutorials. Design of flexible and rigid pavements, including bituminous pavement materials will also be discussed. The module will conclude with a brief introduction to airports and seaports.

CVE2281 Professional Communication and Development

The Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP) is a key feature of all degree programmes offered in SIT. It is an eight to twelve-month stint where SIT students are immersed in a real work environment. In this authentic work situation, students are expected to integrate knowledge and practice, understand broader trends in the industry, and initiate and develop innovative projects with accompanying solutions.

Part 1: Career Search Skills
In order to prepare students to secure their first IWSP position, the CVE2281 Professional Communication and Development (PCD) module aims to provide students with the experience of going through the entire process of job search, from submitting their job application letter and resume to attending a mock job interview session. The knowledge and skills, acquired by students through this module and the IWSP, would form a valuable source for students to draw from as they look for their first full-time job upon graduation and as they plan their career. This module, conducted via small-group workshops and individual e-learning, allows students to maximally gain meaningful learning and practice.

The topics that they are guided through in the module to get that job are:
Career Planning & Management
Job Search Strategies
Resume Writing and Cover Letter
Interview Skills

Students must participate fully in all the sessions and do prior reading and preparation before coming for each class. Students are also expected to earnestly complete all the module assignments that have been created for them to enhance their job-search skills. They are encouraged to use such learned skills in applying for an IWSP position.

Part 2: Engineering Communication
In addition to the career skills, the module aims to impart to students a purposeful and ethical outlook towards professional communication and to enable them to develop communication strategies that are audience-focused and goal-centred, with emphasis on written communication at the workplace. This will be done through critical analyses of communicative texts and events, and applications of principles of effective communication through a variety of communication activities.

Year 2 Trimester 3
CVE2321 Design of Steel and Concrete Structures

This module is a sequel to the previous module CVE2222 Structural Design and serves to deepen understanding of structural design by applying what was learned in the previous module to an actual building design case study. Students will be taught how to frame up the structure, select the material, worked out the relevant combination of actions and carry out the necessary structural analysis to determine the design forces. Guidance will be given to a proper selection of concrete and steel materials, resistance calculations of reinforced concrete beams, columns and slabs to Eurocode 2 (Design of Concrete Structures) and steel beams, columns and connections to Eurocode 3 (Design of Steel Structures). The main objective of this module is to prepare students to undertake the CVE2371 Design Project module during their OIP in Glasgow.

CVE2331 Foundation Engineering

The objective of the module is to provide students with a basic understanding of the geotechnical principles in the design and analysis of foundations. The topics will cover the bearing capacity and settlement of shallow and deep foundations. Students will be engaged in active learning through lectures, recommended reading materials, tutorial discussions and quiz. Design of foundations will be based on Eurocode 7. Knowledge of CVE1231 (Engineering Geology & Soil Mechanics) is mandatory.

CVE2361 Construction Technology

This module aims to provide students with a general understanding of various construction methodologies, machinery, and technologies used for the implementation of construction projects. Students will be exposed to various types of civil engineering works, including case studies of building and civil engineering projects in Singapore and overseas. Related legislations and industrial practices such as safety and buildability issues are also discussed.

CVE2371 Design Project

Through this module, you will be afforded the opportunity to work on a group design project as part of your overseas immersion programme at the University of Glasgow, UK. 

Key takeaway(s):

  • Benefit from this 3-week intensive and hands-on experience of a real-life design office environment. 
  • Get acquainted with the different areas of civil engineering including site selection, architectural and structural concept design, structural analysis, computer-aided drawing, and foundation design.
     
CVE2372 Seminar and Site Visit

This module consists of regular technical seminar sessions and project site visits. The technical lecture will be given by industry experts and leaders focusing on various aspects of civil engineering practices and projects.
The speakers come from a variety of civil engineering sectors encompassing consultants, contractors, government agency, software developer, etc. Furthermore, the expertise area of the speakers varies broadly covering a wide spectrum of civil engineering discipline such as structural, geotechnical, construction technology, software, etc. Site visits to major civil engineering projects in Singapore will be arranged to expose the students with the real-world built environment and its complexity and challenges. At least two seminars and/or two site visits will be organised.

Year 3 Trimester 1
CVE2371 Design Project

Through this module, you will be afforded the opportunity to work on a group design project as part of your overseas immersion programme at the University of Glasgow, UK. 

Key takeaway(s):

  • Benefit from this 3-week intensive and hands-on experience of a real-life design office environment. 
  • Get acquainted with the different areas of civil engineering including site selection, architectural and structural concept design, structural analysis, computer-aided drawing, and foundation design.
     
CVE3171 Integrated Work Study Programme

This is an uninterrupted 8-month (i.e. 2 trimesters) IntegratedWork-Study Programme (IWSP) where students undertake training within companies in the construction and built environment sector while applying their knowledge and skills acquired from 26 modules within the first two academic years to real-world civil engineering problems. It will provide them with the opportunity to apply engineering knowledge, analyse and investigate complex civil engineering problems and design the appropriate solutions with social, environmental and ethical considerations.

All faculty are involved in the supervision of the IWSP students. To further ensure attainment of the IWSP learning outcomes (outlined in Section 2 below), an additional group of academic staff, the Professional Officers (POs) will act as first-line mentors to students, bridging the academic expertise of the faculty and the needs of the students during their work experience. These POs are specialists in the respective technical areas and are typically experienced civil engineers with a strong understanding of the specific skills, knowledge and experience needed by the construction and built environment sector.

During the IWSP, students are challenged with complex real-world civil engineering problems in the industry. These real commercial projects, always multidisciplinary in nature, are accomplished by teamwork with contributions from individual team members from various disciplines. Students are required to provide the most economically desirable and detailed design solution(s) to the problems tasked to them by their work supervisor(s). In the process of arriving at such solution(s), students are also required to identify and understand the
constraints from societal, health, safety, legal and cultural aspects, and apply them in ruling out other potential solutions. Through this process, they will take on the social and ethical responsibilities relevant to professional engineering practice. To enhance their learning, students are required to reflect on the implication of their work through the submission of bi-weekly logs, documenting their attainment of the various learning outcomes of this IWSP module. These bi-weekly logs are endorsed by their work supervisors, who are also involved in the assessment component of this module.

To reinforce the applied learning outcomes, students are required to return (back-to-campus) to the University for learning workshops to fulfil their knowledge and skills gaps identified by the academic and work supervisors. These workshops focus on various aspects, such as the need to maintain professional conduct and ethics in the workplace, construction financing, planning and management. Such workshops are conducted by practising construction professionals. This provides a platform for students to discuss different challenges that they face with these industry experts and help to strengthen what they have learnt prior to and during IWSP.

The curriculum completed before IWSP was structured for students to acquire design principles and skills to solve problems of increasing complexity. They were first tasked with simple design assessments in Academic Year 1 such as the study of the project brief of a real civil engineering project to identify potential issues impacting sustainability and safety, validate their assumptions through actual site visit and apply Plan-Do-Check-Act framework to propose solutions to the issues. In Academic Year 2, numerous design projects and assignments are incorporated into all modules where the level of complexity has increased with the need for research-based knowledge (for selected projects) but the problems are frequently-encountered civil engineering issues encompassed by standards and codes of practice for professional engineering. An example is CVE2321 Design of Steel & Concrete Structures assignment 1, where students are required to design a reinforced concrete structural framing system consisting of reinforced concrete beams, columns and slabs for a 7-storey school block in accordance to Eurocodes EN1990, EN1991-1-1 and EN1991-1-4. At the end of Academic Year 2, the students are involved in CVE2371 Design Project which was intended to be a close representation of a real design office project and consists of a larger design task, such as a university museum design. The student’s assignment included the choice of site, materials, architectural design, consideration of environmental and sustainability elements, design of the structural scheme and structural member detailing. The complexity level of this design is on track to achieve EAB’s definition of complex engineering problems where it involves wide-ranging and conflicting technical data (i.e. geotechnical, environmental, structural and economic constraints) with no obvious solution and will require some research-based knowledge on the specific design requirements.

Equipped with this knowledge and skills acquired from the first two years of the curriculum, the students are challenged with complex real-world engineering problems encountered during IWSP which will stretch their limits of knowledge and skills, and culminate in identifying and working on a suitable industry Capstone Project (CVE3371) targeted at solving their IWSP company’s technical problems and challenges with guidance from both their academic and work supervisors.

CVE3371 Capstone Project

The capstone project is designed for the final year students to pursue an in-depth independent study to solve complex real-world civil engineering problems by integrating and building on their engineering knowledge and skills acquired in classrooms, design projects and Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP).

The capstone project will be initiated when the students are undertaking the IWSP placement with industry partners. Therefore, with a focus on applied learning, students will have to propose an individual technical project with strong industrial relevance with guidance from both SIT and work supervisors. There are four focus areas in our civil engineering programme which the students can pursue depending on their interests, i.e., structural, geotechnical, construction and hydraulics engineering.

The specific capstone project can vary widely within these four focus areas, but to a large extent, the proposed project will depend on the industry problems observed during the IWSP. The nature of the projects could involve several methods, such as design projects, analytical studies, computational studies, experimental studies, construction methods, project management and planning, and others. To qualify as a capstone project, the students are required to maintain academic rigour, whilst ensuring the work remains practical and also maintains the characteristics of a complex civil engineering problem.

During the execution of the capstone project, the students shall aim to achieve desired learning outcomes in the most effective ways. This requires cultivating the necessary engineering knowledge and industry-relevant skills, also including the unknown territories beyond the knowledge and skills acquired from classrooms. In the process, the students shall also develop necessary soft skills such as effective communication, project management and planning, goal setting and life-long learning.

Under the guidance from both SIT and work supervisors, the students are required to identify, formulate, research the literature for, undertake, and report their industry capstone projects. This process spans throughout three trimesters or 1-year long-duration culminating in a final capstone project report. Upon completion, the students will present the projects, including their processes and substantiation and arriving at the final outcomes, to a panel of assessors comprising supervisors and examiners.

The capstone project encourages the students to think critically when addressing and solving complex civil engineering problems relevant to the industry. The project also supports the development of SIT’s DNA in our graduates in order for them to become work-ready.

Year 3 Trimester 2
CVE3171 Integrated Work Study Programme

This is an uninterrupted 8-month (i.e. 2 trimesters) IntegratedWork-Study Programme (IWSP) where students undertake training within companies in the construction and built environment sector while applying their knowledge and skills acquired from 26 modules within the first two academic years to real-world civil engineering problems. It will provide them with the opportunity to apply engineering knowledge, analyse and investigate complex civil engineering problems and design the appropriate solutions with social, environmental and ethical considerations. 

All faculty are involved in the supervision of the IWSP students. To further ensure attainment of the IWSP learning outcomes (outlined in Section 2 below), an additional group of academic staff, the Professional Officers (POs) will act as first-line mentors to students, bridging the academic expertise of the faculty and the needs of the students during their work experience. These POs are specialists in the respective technical areas and are typically experienced civil engineers with a strong understanding of the specific skills, knowledge and experience needed by the construction and built environment sector.

During the IWSP, students are challenged with complex real-world civil engineering problems in the industry. These real commercial projects, always multidisciplinary in nature, are accomplished by teamwork with contributions from individual team members from various disciplines. Students are required to provide the most economically desirable and detailed design solution(s) to the problems tasked to them by their work supervisor(s). In the process of arriving at such solution(s), students are also required to identify and understand the
constraints from societal, health, safety, legal and cultural aspects, and apply them in ruling out other potential solutions. Through this process, they will take on the social and ethical responsibilities relevant to professional engineering practice. To enhance their learning, students are required to reflect on the implication of their work through the submission of bi-weekly logs, documenting their attainment of the various learning outcomes of this IWSP module. These bi-weekly logs are endorsed by their work supervisors, who are also involved in the assessment component of this module.

To reinforce the applied learning outcomes, students are required to return (back-to-campus) to the University for learning workshops to fulfil their knowledge and skills gaps identified by the academic and work supervisors. These workshops focus on various aspects, such as the need to maintain professional conduct and ethics in the workplace, construction financing, planning and management. Such workshops are conducted by practicing construction professionals. This provides a platform for students to discuss different challenges that they face with these industry experts and help to strengthen what they have learnt prior to and during IWSP.

The curriculum completed before IWSP was structured for students to acquire design principles and skills to solve problems of increasing complexity. They were first tasked with simple design assessments in Academic Year 1 such as the study of the project brief of a real civil engineering project to identify potential issues impacting sustainability and safety, validate their assumptions through actual site visit and apply Plan-Do-Check-Act framework to propose solutions to the issues. In Academic Year 2, numerous design projects and assignments are incorporated into all modules where the level of complexity has increased with the need for research-based knowledge (for selected projects) but the problems are frequently-encountered civil engineering issues encompassed by standards and codes of practice for professional engineering. An example is CVE2321 Design of Steel & Concrete Structures assignment 1, where students are required to design a reinforced concrete structural framing system consisting of reinforced concrete beams, columns and slabs for a 7-storey school block in accordance to Eurocodes EN1990, EN1991-1-1 and EN1991-1-4. At the end of Academic Year 2, the students are involved in CVE2371 Design Project which was intended to be a close representation of a real design office project and consists of a larger design task, such as a university museum design. The student’s assignment included the choice of site, materials, architectural design, consideration of environmental and sustainability elements, design of the structural scheme and structural member detailing. The complexity level of this design is on track to achieve EAB’s definition of complex engineering problems where it involves wide-ranging and conflicting technical data (i.e. geotechnical, environmental, structural and economic constraints) with no obvious solution and will require some research-based knowledge on the specific design requirements.

Equipped with this knowledge and skills acquired from the first two years of the curriculum, the students are challenged with complex real-world engineering problems encountered during IWSP which will stretch their limits of knowledge and skills, and culminate in identifying and working on a suitable industry Capstone Project (CVE3371) targeted at solving their IWSP company’s technical problems and challenges with guidance from both their academic and work supervisor.

CVE3371 Capstone Project

The capstone project is designed for the final year students to pursue an in-depth independent study to solve complex real-world civil engineering problems by integrating and building on their engineering knowledge and skills acquired in classrooms, design projects and Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP).

The capstone project will be initiated when the students are undertaking the IWSP placement with industry partners. Therefore, with a focus on applied learning, students will have to propose an individual technical project with strong industrial relevance with guidance from both SIT and work supervisors. There are four focus areas in our civil engineering programme which the students can pursue depending on their interests, i.e., structural, geotechnical, construction and hydraulics engineering.

The specific capstone project can vary widely within these four focus areas, but to a large extent, the proposed project will depend on the industry problems observed during the IWSP. The nature of the projects could involve several methods, such as design projects, analytical studies, computational studies, experimental studies, construction methods, project management and planning, and others. To qualify as a capstone project, the students are required to maintain academic rigour, whilst ensuring the work remains practical and also maintains the characteristics of a complex civil engineering problem.

During the execution of the capstone project, the students shall aim to achieve desired learning outcomes in the most effective ways. This requires cultivating the necessary engineering knowledge and industry-relevant skills, also including the unknown territories beyond the knowledge and skills acquired from classrooms. In the process, the students shall also develop necessary soft skills such as effective communication, project management and planning, goal setting and life-long learning.

Under the guidance from both SIT and work supervisors, the students are required to identify, formulate, research the literature for, undertake, and report their industry capstone projects. This process spans throughout three trimesters or 1-year long-duration culminating in a final capstone project report. Upon completion, the students will present the projects, including their processes and substantiation and arriving at the final outcomes, to a panel of assessors comprising supervisors and examiners.

The capstone project encourages the students to think critically when addressing and solving complex civil engineering problems relevant to the industry. The project also supports the development of SIT’s DNA in our graduates in order for them to become work-ready.

Year 3 Trimester 3
CVE3331 Ground Engineering

This module introduces slope analysis and various ground improvement or stabilization methods that are commonly used when a given site is unsuitable for a proposed project. The emphasis is on understanding the concept of failure in soil mechanics and being able to recommend suitable ground improvement methods for slopes and problematic soils. Geotechnical instrumentation and monitoring will also be taught in this module; in particular, the application of such instrumentation to deep excavations and ground improvement projects shall be discussed. Knowledge of CVE1231 (Engineering Geology and Soil Mechanics) is mandatory.

CVE3351 Special Topics in Civil Engineering

This module focuses on special topics covering the four major themes of civil engineering:
Topic 1 - Bridge Engineering (Design/Construction of Prestressed Concrete Bridges)
Topic 2 - Rail Engineering
Topic 3 - Structural Engineering (Design/Construction of Timber Structures)
Topic 4 - Water Resource Engineering
Assessment will involve a technical design or report in each of the four topics.

CVE3361 Civil Engineering Practices

The module is aimed to equip students with a good understanding of basic Construction Law and good exposure to its application in contract advisory and dispute management area in the construction industry under its legal framework. Students will be exposed to all major issues that are commonly encountered by those in the construction industry. These include: delays and liquidated damages, claims for payments under the Security of Payment Act, calls on performance bonds, damages for defects variation claims and termination of contracts.

CVE3362 Project Planning and Management

This module covers the principles and techniques of managing engineering and construction projects from the initial conceptual phase, through design and construction, to completion. Module content comprises Project Initiation, Early Estimates, Project Budgeting, Development of Work Plan, Design Proposals, Project Scheduling, Tracking Work, Design Coordination, Construction Phase and Project Close-Out.

CVE3371 Capstone Project

The capstone project is designed for the final year students to pursue an in-depth independent study to solve complex real-world civil engineering problems by integrating and building on their engineering knowledge and skills acquired in classrooms, design projects and Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP).

The capstone project will be initiated when the students are undertaking the IWSP placement with industry partners. Therefore, with a focus on applied learning, students will have to propose an individual technical project with strong industrial relevance with guidance from both SIT and work supervisors. There are four focus areas in our civil engineering programme which the students can pursue depending on their interests, i.e., structural, geotechnical, construction and hydraulics engineering.

The specific capstone project can vary widely within these four focus areas, but to a large extent, the proposed project will depend on the industry problems observed during the IWSP. The nature of the projects could involve several methods, such as design projects, analytical studies, computational studies, experimental studies, construction methods, project management and planning, and others. To qualify as a capstone project, the students are required to maintain academic rigour, whilst ensuring the work remains practical and also maintains the characteristics of a complex civil engineering problem.

During the execution of the capstone project, the students shall aim to achieve desired learning outcomes in the most effective ways. This requires cultivating the necessary engineering knowledge and industry-relevant skills, also including the unknown territories beyond the knowledge and skills acquired from classrooms. In the process, the students shall also develop necessary soft skills such as effective communication, project management and planning, goal setting and life-long learning.

Under the guidance from both SIT and work supervisors, the students are required to identify, formulate, research the literature for, undertake, and report their industry capstone projects. This process spans throughout three trimesters or 1-year long-duration culminating in a final capstone project report. Upon completion, the students will present the projects, including their processes and substantiation and arriving at the final outcomes, to a panel of assessors comprising supervisors and examiners.

The capstone project encourages the students to think critically when addressing and solving complex civil engineering problems relevant to the industry. The project also supports the development of SIT’s DNA in our graduates in order for them to become work-ready.

Campus Location
SIT@Dover
SIT@Dover

10 Dover Drive
Singapore 138683