Chemical Engineering, BEng (Hons)

Programme Overview
The SIT-Newcastle University (NU) joint degree programme in Chemical Engineering aims to produce graduates who have a clear understanding of Chemical Engineering, combining a sound theoretical grasp of the subject with practical experience and an awareness of their responsibility to society and the environment. Consisting of key, traditional Chemical Engineering topics such as Transfer Processes and Unit Operations, and including contemporary and globally important areas such as Sustainable Design and Clean Technology, students will learn how to critically analyse real-world process engineering problems through the use of computational tools. Assessment will be based on several components such as coursework and written examinations. Students will have the opportunity to creatively apply what they have learnt to solve challenges posed by their final year capstone plant design project. The academic training and soft skills acquired through the programme, will produce capable graduates who will go on to become professional chemical engineers in the industry. Graduates may also eventually choose to pursue industrial research to develop new solutions and innovative processes or a postgraduate route to an academic career.

Programme Highlights

  • Practical Bias

Subjects are taught with a practical bias and the majority of modules have a substantive coursework component, complementing theory with practice.

  • Problem-solving and the use of Computational Tools

Students will develop problem-solving skills and gain valuable experience through the use of commercial computational tools to solve chemical engineering problems.

  • Gain Work Experience While Studying

Students will gain six to eight months of work experience under the Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP) in the process engineering industry, with the unique opportunity to work on industry projects and solve problems.

Eligibility and Exemption

Diploma holders from any of the five local polytechnics and A level graduates are welcome to apply. Subject to approval, applicants with Chemical Engineering or closely related diplomas may be granted module exemptions, based on the modules taken during their diploma.

Integrating Work and Study

Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP)
Students will undergo a credited, 26-week full-time employment at an organisation relevant to their area of study. The IWSP provides students the opportunity to apply their engineering knowledge and practice professional skills learned through the programme, at the same time gaining valuable work and first-hand industry experience.

Overseas Immersion Programme (OIP)
Students will undergo a three-week overseas immersion programme at the home campus in Newcastle, United Kingdom during which they will have the opportunity to participate in personal and career development workshops and other academic activities. The OIP also presents students with sufficient time to travel around the region, and participate in cultural and social events.

MODULE SYNOPSIS

Year 1
CHE1011 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 1

This module will introduce students into varieties of concepts, mathematical techniques and skills to solve relevant engineering problems. Different topics will be covered in this module under three different themes: linear algebra, ordinary differential equations (1st and 2nd order) and infinite series (with single and two variables). The module topics will be covered in lectures, which will also include worked examples to demonstrate to students how to apply the knowledge and techniques presented in the lectures. Class exercise will also be given during lectures to promote student-lecturer and student-student interactions. Additionally, such exercises will serve as a formative assessment and allow the lecturer to gauge students learning and provide immediate feedback.

Complex problems will also be provided in tutorials to allow students to practice and apply the knowledge and skills learnt in lectures.

In addition to formative assessment, summative assessments will also be conducted in this module through two assignments and final examination. The key objective of these summative assessments is to measure the achievements of the module learning outcomes. The two assignments will compromise complex problems, which will require students to pursue some additional knowledge and skills not covered in the lecture notes or in tutorial through independent learning. Final exam will be a comprehensive test covering many knowledge and skills learnt throughout this module.

CHE1012 STATISTICS

This module will equip students with the basics in statistics, which can be divided into descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. The first half of the module will start with descriptive statistics which deal with collecting, summarizing, and processing data to transform it into useful information. Next, probability theory will be introduced which forms the basis for inferential statistics. The second half of the module will continue with inferential statistics which deal with making estimations and decisions based on the information obtained from sample data. Topics covered in the module include descriptive statistics, probability theory and distributions, sampling distributions, inferential statistics and regression analysis.  Students will be assessed by in-class quizzes and a final exam.

CHE1013 TECHNICAL WRITING AND EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

Communication has long been taken as a core competency for undergraduate students in all major universities in the world and is a prerequisite skill almost invariably required by employers in today’s knowledge-based economy. Important communication skills for engineering undergraduates include the ability to write technical information to technical and non-technical audiences and present such information coherently and clearly in oral communication. This module aims to develop such ability of engineering undergraduates through technical report writing and oral presentation activities.

CHE1014 MASS AND ENERGY BALANCES

This module prepares learners to formulate and solve mass and energy balances on chemical process systems in the pharmaceutical engineering context, and lays the foundation for subsequent courses in thermodynamics, unit operations, as well as process monitoring, automation, and control. In essence, this course introduces an engineering approach to problem solving by the following steps: (i) breaking a process down to its components, (ii) establishing the relations between known and unknown process variables, (iii) assembling the information needed to solve for the unknowns, and finally (iv) obtaining the solution using appropriate computational methods.

This module utilizes lectures, in-lecture activities, and tutorials to help students achieve the course objectives. Students’ progress is assessed through a combination assignments, quizzes and a final exam. Group work contributes significantly to the total grade. 

CHE1015 BIOMOLECULAR SCIENCE

This module covers basic molecular biology principles, as well as central dogma of biology that encompasses transcription, translation, expression. Enzyme kinetics and cellular transport systems will be covered. Analysis of key metabolic processes such as glycolysis and TCA cycle will also be included.

 

CHE1021 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 2

This module will cover advanced mathematical concepts which can be used to solve complex engineering problems. Topics covered include partial differentiation and partial differential equations, Fourier analysis, multiple integrals, vector algebra and calculus.

CHE1022 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

This module covers the characteristics, synthesis methods and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. Topics taught include (i) nucleophilic substitution, elimination, electrophilic additions/substitutions, oxidations and reduction, (ii) functional group transformation, (ii) disconnection approach to synthesis, and (iv) synthesis of polyfunctional organic molecules, stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms.

CHE1023 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

The Organic Chemistry Laboratory module comprises hands-on experimental activities to reinforce fundamental understanding of the underlying principles taught in the Organic Chemistry lecture module. Students will also be trained in laboratory safety practices, hazard identification, risk assessment, technical report writing and presentation skills.

CHE2017 COMPUTING AND SIMULATION

This module introduces two computational tools and some numerical algorithms that may be used to help solve Chemical Engineering problems. The MATLAB programming environment is used to teach the concepts of high-level programming while flowsheeting is introduced via UNISIM.

The MATLAB environment, matrix handling, basic house-keeping commands, scripts and functions, conditionals, for-next and while loops, plotting and other commands are taught through a series of labs/workshops.

Students are introduced to flowsheeting using UNISIM. How to navigate the UNISIM user interface, how to set up the simulation basis, how to use the unit operation models available in UNISIM are taught using step by step examples of how to set up a process simulation.

Students will be taught numerical algorithms used in root finding, solving sets of algebraic equations and used in the solution of ODEs. The theoretical bases and relative merits of these algorithms are covered and students will learn how to apply the techniques, including the use of SIMULINK to simulate dynamical systems.

CHE2016 THERMODYNAMICS

The aim is of this module is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the basic principles of chemical engineering thermodynamics and how to apply these thermodynamic principles in chemical engineering processes. The course will cover Properties of pure substances; Properties of ideal and non-ideal systems; Phase equilibria and solution thermodynamics; Reaction equilibria; Equations of state; Compression cycles.

Year 2
CHE2011 FLUID MECHANICS

This module provides an enhanced understanding of fluid flow and properties. The fundamental fluid concepts are reviewed first. Momentum balance is introduced and applied to flow problems in both macroscopic and microscopic levels. The governing fluid flow equations, including continuity equations and motion equations, are obtained in 3D form in tensor notation and they are applied to the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid flows in simple geometries. Turbulent flow is studied using Reynolds stress.  

The typical process flow problems are also examined and related to the process industries. Pipe networking part covers the design of pumping systems, pipe networks, pump selection, pump curves and Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH). Compressible flow focuses on the pressure drop calculations through energy balance, maximum flow and compressor characteristics and selection. Multi-phase flow includes the flow regime identification and friction loss calculations.  Mixing is introduced, which covers mixing equipment, vortexing and baffles, power curves, blending, solids suspension and gas/liquid dispersion.

This course aims to generalise fluid mechanics so that at a later stage, the knowledge gained can easily be used in numerical simulations, such that the students understand the meaning and implications of exact/approximate solutions in the description of fluids, flow geometry and flow kinematics.

Lectures convey the mathematical concepts and techniques in fluid mechanics; tutorials are used to provide supervised problem solving. Assignments are for independent study and research.

CHE2012 TRANSFER PROCESSES 2 (HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER)

The mass transfer part of the module explains the processes of mass transfer and diffusion and how they relate to engineering systems of separation and reactions. Topics to be covered include diffusion and diffusion coefficients; Fick’s 1st law and equimolar counter diffusion; Diffusion through a stationary phase; Stefan’s Law; Two film theory; Individual and overall mass transfer coefficients. Unit operations such as leach and evaporation will be covered.
The heat transfer part of this module aims to give students extend students’ knowledge of the principles of heat transfer and to provide a fundamental knowledge of design criteria for typical forms of heat exchangers used in the process industries. It will also aims to enable the students to analyse heat transfer in systems where there is change of phase; to allow the students to analyse systems where radiative heat transfer is significant/dominant and to ensure that students can design and choose appropriate equipment in their design projects.
This module introduces the 3 basic types of heat transfer: conduction, convection and radiation. For conduction, students will be introduced to Fourier’s Equation to describe conduction through different 1-D geometries and composite systems. For convection, students will be introduced Newton’s Law of Cooling and different convection correlations. For radiation, students will be introduced to Stefan-Boltzmann equation and the basic principles of radiative heat transfer (black body vs. real body vs. grey body). Also, students will be introduced to combined modes of heat transfer that are presented as thermal resistances in thermal circuits of combined heat transfer modes in series and parallel, including radiation. The students will learn about the overall heat transfer coefficient, log mean temperature and heat exchanger design. Also, students will learn in depth the design methodology of shell-and-tube and cross flow heat exchangers by applying Effectiveness-NTU and F-factor methods. Also, students’ study of heat transfer is extended to systems which are no longer steady state and have changes in phase. Student will learn about boiling (nucleate and film boiling) and condensing (Film and dropwise condensation) heat transfer. Finally, students will be introduced transient heat transfer (the lumped capacitance method). By the end of the module the students will be able to understand many everyday examples of heat transfer, as well as being able to solve many steady state heat transfer calculations that Chemical Engineers encounter on plant.
This module will allow students to understand the fundamental principles of multimode, boiling and condensing heat transfer; to analyse numerous heat transfer problems, including systems with multiple heat transfer modes, multiple layers multiple phases and of varying geometries; to understand and apply the principles of radiative heat transfer to simple well-defined systems; to know how to design and choose between different types of heat exchangers.
Complex problems will also be provided in tutorials to allow students to practice and apply the knowledge and skills learnt in lectures.
In addition to formative assessment, summative assessments will also be conducted in this module through one assignment and final examination. The semester’s assignment will compromise an open-ended problem, which will require students to pursue some additional knowledge and skills not covered in the lecture notes or in tutorial through independent learning. Final exam will be a comprehensive test covering many knowledge and skills learnt throughout this module. The key objective of these summative assessments is to measure the achievements of the module learning outcomes.

 

CHE2013 REACTOR ENGINEERING 1

This module covers the fundamentals of reaction engineering. The following is an outline of the syllabus:
Reactors: Introduction to batch and continuous reactor operation, batch reactor design equation, Plug flow reactor design equation, CSTR design equation,
Single reactions: Constant pressure and constant volume batch reactors, Plug flow reactors,
CSTRs: Comparison of PFR and CSTR and CSTRs in series, Similarity between series of CSTRs and PFR, Recycle reactor
Multiple reactions: Introduction to multiple reactions, parallel reactions of the same order, Parallel reactions of different orders, Consecutive reactions
Energy balance: Effect of temperature on reaction rate, Forms of the energy balance, PFR energy balance, CSTR energy balance
Non ideal reactors and residence time distribution

 

CHE2014 SEPARATION PROCESSES 1

This module aims to give students an understanding of the separation technologies used in the process industries by applying mass transfer theory and phase equilibria. The module will start with a short review of basic principles of phase equilibria & separations. Afterwards, this module will covers the following topics: introduction to equilibrium stage separations (e.g. distillation) and rate controlled separations (e.g. gas absorption, stripping); multistage separation; continuous and batch distillation; McCabe-Thiele method; effect of reflux ratio; flash Distillation; hydraulic design of distillation columns; introduction to various types of column internals: trays and packings and merits of using each type; sieve tray design; design of packed columns and basic principles of liquid-liquid extraction.

This module intends to teach the students about applying their knowledge of the role of equilibrium in the conceptual design of separation processes (distillation and liquid/liquid extraction). Also, this module intends to strengthen the students’ knowledge of the design and specification methods for separation processes. With specific understanding of the processes of distillation and familiarity with the equipment related to these processes, students will gain a knowledge of the operational characteristics of plate and packed columns; knowledge of the relative merits of each type of column internal based on operating range, cost, etc. to make an appropriate selection for a given separation duty and knowledge and understanding of the design characteristics of both types of tower. Complex problems will also be provided in tutorials to allow students to practice and apply the knowledge and skills learnt in lectures.

In addition to formative assessment, summative assessments will also be conducted in this module through one assignment and final examination. The semester’s assignment will compromise an open-ended problem, which will require students to pursue some additional knowledge and skills not covered in the lecture notes or in tutorial through independent learning. Final exam will be a comprehensive test covering many knowledge and skills learnt throughout this module. The key objective of these summative assessments is to measure the achievements of the module learning outcomes. Specifically, these assessments will measure the students’ ability to apply the material balance design equation for selected separation processes; application of numerical and computer skills to design problems; ability to incorporate the theory of mass transport and/or phase equilibria with material balance design equations and apply them to the design of mass transfer separation processes; ability to apply knowledge of design methods for tray and packed columns either to size a new column or to evaluate the suitability of existing columns for a given separation duty; ability to develop separation column simulations in UniSim; report writing and information management.

CHE2015 ENGINEERING PRACTICE

This module aims to in-still into students the understanding of the design and operation of plant utilities that are essential for the operation of biochemical, chemical, process and manufacturing plants. Concepts and principles behind the design and operation of plant utilities such as steam generation, water treatment, compressed air, inert gas and process cooling systems are covered.

Engineering materials are covered in order for students to appreciate the properties of different materials, their performance characteristics and how to select materials for specific engineering applications. Polymeric, composite materials, different types and grades of metals, and insulation materials are covered including strength of materials, corrosion and erosion resistance, material design, sizing of material thickness and the types of joints in material fabrication and structure erection.

The learning materials are delivered in lectures and tutorial spreading across the semester. During tutorial, the students are given formative feedback as they work through the coursework and their in-class assignment. The assessment method include coursework submission as well as examination at the end of the semester.

The other aspect of this module is the engineering laboratory practice. This part of the module provides training in engineering skills, reinforces knowledge and understanding of concepts learnt in class and gives opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and understanding in completing the laboratory practice and submitting laboratory report.

Students work in groups of three to four on a rotating laboratory schedule to complete the practical classes spreading across two tri-semesters. Assessment of each practical includes submission of pre-experimental assignment, laboratory class and laboratory report. In-class hands-on practical skills, compliance to health and safety code of practice, presentation, and report-writing skills will be assessed in addition to other soft skills such as teamwork, leadership skills, time management and task management skills.

CHE2021 PROCESS MEASUREMENT, DYNAMICS and CONTROL

Process control is about understanding the dynamics of the process, selecting an appropriate measurement device for the controlled variable and making adjustments to the process to keep the controlled variable at a desired value. This module provides an introduction to basic Process Control.

Students will learn how signals from process sensors are measured, transmitted and conditioned. The factors that should be considered when specifying process instrumentation are also covered. These include the common metrics of instrumentation capabilities, safety aspects and costing.

The module emphasises that time-dependent behaviour has significant influence on process design, operation and safety. General representations of dynamical systems are presented. Students will be taught Laplace Transforms, the mathematical tool for analysing the dynamic behaviour of linear time-invariant systems. The concept of feedback control is introduced and students will learn several techniques for tuning 3-term PID controllers and how to analyse a close loop system for stability.

Finally, students will be taught how to draw P&IDs to depict instrumentation deployed in a chemical process plant.

CHE2022 PROCESS SAFETY

This module provides an understanding of basic safety related to the Chemical Engineering Industry within the context of the legislative framework and requirements in Singapore.  There is extensive coverage on tools and techniques to identify and assess hazards/risk, process safety in design and safety management systems that ensure the safe and efficient operation of chemical processes.

CHE2023 REACTOR ENGINEERING 2

This module aims to instil in students, the understanding and skills in designing and operating biological and catalytic reactors. The module builds from fundamental concepts in biological and chemical reactions to engineering systems that are designed to produce these products in large scale.

This module covers both aspects of biological reactors and chemical catalytic reactors, including their design and operation. Concepts of biological cell cultivation are covered from laboratory scale to industrial scale, with emphasis on how important operating parameters are monitored and controlled to optimise the synthesis of biological and biochemical products. Bio-reaction kinetics, culture growth rates, material and energy balance are covered with various equations and models derived from first principles.

Batch and continuous cell cultivation are covered including various bioreactor system design and operation. Bioreactor sizing, engineering the design for optimised mixing, mass transport and heat transport systems are covered. Engineering controls to ensure contamination-free cultivation and covered with concepts of biohazards and sterilisation included.

Chemical equilibria including spontaneity, Gibb’s free energy, chemical potential, reaction equilibria, conversion, product yield and reaction kinetics are taught in this module. Reaction mechanisms of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reactions are covered. Rate equations integrating reaction kinetics with mass transfer diffusion resistances are derived from first principles for heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Mathematical models for packed bed and fluidised bed catalytic reactor are taught with reactor sizing, engineering design for mixing, mass transport and heat transport.

Lectures across the 12-week trimester are used to deliver the learning materials with weekly tutorials used to provide student feedback. The assessment method is in the form of an assignment and a final examination at the end of the semester.

CHE2024 SEPARATION PROCESSES 2

This module is to give the students an understanding of the separation technology used in the modern chemical industry. Thermodynamics are reviewed and applied to predict phase equilibrium.  Five industrially important separation techniques are studied in detail, which include azeotropic distillation, multicomponent distillation, gas absorption, membrane separations and adsorption. Thermodynamics, mass balance and mass transfer are employed through different separation processes. Focus is on the process conceptual design and solving separation problems.

CHE2025 CAREER AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

This module equips students with necessary skills for their career in chemical engineering. In the first part of the module, students are taught to communicate competently and ethically in various workplace communicative situations. This is accomplished through critical analyses of events as well as applications of principles of effective communication. In the process, the course also helps develop students’ ability to communicate engineering practice to diverse audiences.

In the second part of the module, students will be taught skills necessary for actual job applications, preparing them for their IWSP placement. Students will be introduced to the entire process of job search, from submitting their job application letter and resume, to attending a job interview session. The knowledge and skills acquired by the students through this module and the IWSP would be invaluable when they look for a full-time job upon graduation and when they plan their career.

CHE2031 INTEGRATED WORK STUDY PROGRAMME (IWSP)

The IWSP provides students with unique learning opportunities to achieve the following objectives:

a)  Applied  learning  –  integration  of  theory  and  practice,  acquisition  of  specialist knowledge and development of professional skills.

b)  Exposure to real-world conditions- appreciation of real-world constraints in respective industry contexts to develop skills of adaptability, creativity and innovation, while adding value to the work place.

c)  Smooth transition to jobs-practical experience which shortens work induction period, translating to higher productivity and lower training costs to future employers of SIT’s graduates. The work experience acquired may also contribute to professional accreditation/certification requirements if applicable.
The IWSP is an integral part of applied learning as it provides an opportunity for students to integrate what they have learnt in the classroom to what is practiced in the real world, and vice-versa. The extended period of IWSP with students performing real work also provides an opportunity for companies to evaluate the suitability of students as potential employees. In effect, the IWSP is equivalent to the probation period. The student will also have ample opportunity to immerse in the industry’s business and culture and decide if this is a good industry to work in. Besides producing practice-oriented graduates, IWSP will also be the platform through which students will be challenged during their work attachment stint to initiate innovative projects under the guidance of SIT’s IWSP Supervisors and Company appointed Work Supervisors.   Through such projects, students will have the opportunity to develop innovative solutions for the projects they have identified.  In this way, the IWSP will be a key platform that contributes to the inculcation of the SIT-DNA in every student.

 

CHE2032 CHEMICAL PROCESS OPTIMIZATION

This module contains 2 sections.

The first aims to develop an understanding of the principles of standard optimisation techniques and where these techniques can be beneficially applied. The syllabus covers Preliminary mathematics (cost functions, matrices, vectors, Grad., Curl, Least Squares), EVOP, Problem formulation, Necessary and sufficient conditions, Unconstrained multivariable optimisation (gradient based techniques, gradient free), Constrained optimisation (Lagrange multipliers, penalty functions etc.), Linear Programming, Application areas (e.g. Optimisation of Reactors, Distillation trains, Predictive Control) and Basic scheduling methods.

The second part deals with the optimization of Heat Exchanger Networks (HENs) via heat integration. The syllabus covers the basic concepts related to cost and energy savings for process design and for heat exchanger networks, the concept of heat integration. Graphical and numerical representations of a heat exchanger network are taught as are network synthesis based on 'pinch' design rules.

CHE2033 SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRY, DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE

This module aims to provide knowledge and understanding of the need for sustainability to be a key consideration in engineering practice and in business decisions. It provides an understanding of the tools and techniques that may be used to implement cleaner design for more sustainable products and processes.

Year 3
CHE2031 INTEGRATED WORK STUDY PROGRAMME (IWSP)

The IWSP provides students with unique learning opportunities to achieve the following objectives:

a)  Applied  learning  –  integration  of  theory  and  practice,  acquisition  of  specialist knowledge and development of professional skills.

b)  Exposure to real-world conditions- appreciation of real-world constraints in respective industry contexts to develop skills of adaptability, creativity and innovation, while adding value to the work place.

c)  Smooth transition to jobs-practical experience which shortens work induction period, translating to higher productivity and lower training costs to future employers of SIT’s graduates. The work experience acquired may also contribute to professional accreditation/certification requirements if applicable.
The IWSP is an integral part of applied learning as it provides an opportunity for students to integrate what they have learnt in the classroom to what is practiced in the real world, and vice-versa. The extended period of IWSP with students performing real work also provides an opportunity for companies to evaluate the suitability of students as potential employees. In effect, the IWSP is equivalent to the probation period. The student will also have ample opportunity to immerse in the industry’s business and culture and decide if this is a good industry to work in. Besides producing practice-oriented graduates, IWSP will also be the platform through which students will be challenged during their work attachment stint to initiate innovative projects under the guidance of SIT’s IWSP Supervisors and Company appointed Work Supervisors.   Through such projects, students will have the opportunity to develop innovative solutions for the projects they have identified.  In this way, the IWSP will be a key platform that contributes to the inculcation of the SIT-DNA in every student.

 

CHE3021 PROCESS CONTROL 2

This module continues from the Year 2 module, Process Measurement, Dynamics and Control, broadening the coverage to include modern controller tuning methods and higher level control strategies.

Instead of on-line trial and error tuning or correlation based tuning formulae, students will learn the basics of model based tuning methods (Synthesis Equation). They will also learn about feed-forward, cascade and ration control strategies – the rationale and when they should be applied.

The control of a unit process typically requires several variables to be controlled and invariably, there are interactions between the control loops which can cause stability problems. This part of the module therefore concentrates on multi-input multi-output systems; determining whether loop interactions will cause problems and if they do, design appropriate decoupling networks.

Finally, the case of product quality control will be considered. Usually, the entities by which manufactured products are sold are difficult to measure on-line, e.g. stickiness of glue, viscosity of lubricants, etc. This prevents the implementation of automatic control systems with attendant loss of product consistency and quality. Students will learn about inferential control which is a technique which can be used to alleviate such measurement problems.

CHE3022 PROCESS DESIGN, ECONOMICS & PROJECT MANAGEMENT

This module is aimed at getting students to think of ‘design’ as a process and goes through the various stages, from conceptualisation through to the selection of process routes and the development of process flow diagrams. It further develops skills in computer aided process design through the use of UNISIM. The module emphasises the need for thorough planning and work monitoring when executing complex tasks. It provides students with the tools and techniques to actively plan and monitor their own design projects. It also teaches students techniques for estimating the cost and economic viability of a plant.

CHE3023 SOLIDS HANDLING

To provide an understanding of solids separation and handling and the design of basic plant equipment e.g. dryers, crystallisers, filters, centrifuges, fluidised beds.
To provide understanding of design method for specific plant items.
The lectures will introduce concepts of solids handling and separation and specific design procedures.
Tutorials will provide practice in the above areas.
Assignment will enable students to apply the concepts learnt in the module on actual applications.

CHE3025 RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND CLEAN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS

This module aims to introduce students to renewable energy and clean technologies as alternative processes for the chemical engineering industry. This module equips students with knowledge of the range of renewable energy technologies that are currently available. Special attention is given to renewable resources available in Singapore and the development of renewable energy technologies in Singapore.

This module also discuss key problems associated with air, water and land pollution and their impacts on environment and human health and to introduce Clean Technologies as possible solutions.

CHE3031 PLANT DESIGN

In this module, students work in design teams to undertake an open-ended project to design a plant to make specified product. The detailed design of a chemical process requires a combination of many of the core skills acquired over the three years of a degree programme. It represents a unique exercise in which students can apply and test their knowledge of process selection, conceptual design, equipment design, process safety and sustainability and economic analysis as part of a team exercise. This is applied to a typical client specification and requires to be innovative in suggesting a design solution.

This course aims to
give a detailed knowledge of the design of a process from concept to detailed design;
provide the opportunity to apply chemical engineering skills acquired from other courses;
encourage a creative approach to design;
provide experience of working in a team;
provide experience of the presentation of technical material in extended written reports;
meet the requirements of accreditation body.

The large guided independent study element in this module reflects the fact that the development of a design comes from many hours spent investigating design options either privately or as a part of a design group and preparing relevant reports. Fieldwork allows students to visit and learn from real industrial processes. Small group teaching is spent with design supervisors receiving answers to specific questions and providing feedback on reports that have been submitted as well as providing an opportunity to interact with visiting specialists.

 

Campus Location
SIT@Dover
SIT@Dover

10 Dover Drive
Singapore 138683

SIT@Dover
SIT@NP Building

Ngee Ann Polytechnic
537 Clementi Road, Singapore 599493