Naval Architecture, BEng (Hons)

Programme Overview
The Marine programmes, jointly offered by SIT and Newcastle University, are three-year direct honours degrees in various disciplines within marine technology. Well-grounded with fundamentals in marine and offshore technology, students will hone their critical and analytical skills to be practice -oriented and industry-ready in either one of these specialisations – Marine Engineering, Naval Architecture and Offshore Engineering.

Students will go through rigorous academic training and immerse themselves in the marine industry through the Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP) with leading marine and offshore engineering organisations such as Keppel O&M Ltd, Sembcorp Marine Ltd, Singapore Technologies Marine Ltd and Wärtsilä Singapore Pte Ltd.

Students will be able to take up modules which are exclusive to these joint degree programmes such as marine classifications, which cover the rules and regulations applied during the design, production and maintenance phases of marine platforms. Naval Architecture and Offshore Engineering students will learn about the engineering behind the design, structure, operation and management of ships and other large floating structures. Marine Engineering students will be exposed to marine engineering systems, from the main propulsion engines to auxiliary machinery like power generators, pumps, heat exchangers and other machineries within water, air and hydraulic systems.

Programme Highlights

  • Unique And Applied Learning Curricula

The Marine Engineering, Naval Architecture and Offshore Engineering curricula are designed not only to meet the manpower needs of local industries, but also to manifest Singapore’s role as a global marine and offshore engineering centre through SIT’s applied learning emphasis, enabling our graduates to be both practice-oriented and industry-ready.

  • Extensive Industry Involvement

These programmes include a high level of industry involvement to impart the latest industry best practices and regulatory requirements to students. This community of students, industry leaders and practitioners, professional bodies and dedicated academics brings about a symbiotic relationship beyond the academic level, allowing students to create a network of invaluable contacts within the industry.

  • Holistic Marine Graduates

Designed with a strong embellishment of the SIT-DNA, the programmes aim to produce socially responsible graduates who understand the environmental impacts within and across various engineering disciplines.

Eligibility and Exemption

Diploma holders from any of the five local polytechnics and A level graduates are welcome to apply.

Integrating Work and Study

Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP)
The Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP), a key differentiating factor from other related degree programmes, will see students undergoing a credited 26-week long full-time work engagement at a company relevant to their area of study. During this period, students will apply the knowledge, practical and professional skills acquired during their earlier years of study in the IWSP. At the same time, students will gain valuable work experience and apply it to a Capstone and/or design project during their penultimate year of study.

Overseas Immersion Programme (OIP)
All students will have to complete a three-week attachment at the home campus of Newcastle University where they get to live and study in Newcastle, United Kingdom. The programme itinerary will include library and career talks, seminars, research and literature review workshops to prepare students for their final-year dissertation projects, as well as visits to companies, museums and key cultural sites.

MODULE SYNOPSIS

Year 1
MNO1101 Materials in the Marine Environment

This module teaches students to consider the role of materials in the marine and offshore environment and the particular challenges that this environment poses to the selection of materials. The syllabus is designed to develop a knowledge of the structure of materials, showing how the microstructure and manufacturing route can influence the properties of the material. It also considers material failure, typical mechanisms of failure and how failure can be prevented. The course will include case studies and examples of the marine and offshore industry.

 

MNO1102 Electrical Engineering I

This module aims to enable student to understand the principles of electrotechnology needed for marine engineering.

This module covers both the basic electrical principles and circuits as well as the electrical power. The Basic Electrical Principles and Circuits includes General Introduction; DC Circuit Theory; Electromagnetism, Magnetic Circuits; Electromagnetic Induction; Electrostatics; Transient Response; AC Circuit Theory. The Electrical Power includes DC Machines-basic theory; application and types; AC circuit theory-phasor diagrams, power, power factor; transformers-theory; equivalent circuits, construction, applications; introduction to power conditioning.

Students should understand the basic principles of electrical circuits and devices studied, with an emphasis on their use in mechanical and related engineering applications. This module enhances the understanding of the origin of electrical and magnetic behaviour and ability to analyse electrical and magnetic circuits, as well as performing laboratory practical to demonstrate electrical and magnetic effects in real applications.

MNO1103 Marine Mechanics IA

This module covers:
-Statics, which is the use of free body diagrams, equilibrium, friction.
-Dynamics, which is Newton's second law for linear and rotating marine systems; compatibility equations; moment of inertia and radius of gyration, parallel axes and perpendicular axes theorems; introduction to vibration of marine systems.

 

MNO1104 Marine Mechanics IB

This module covers:
-Mechanics of machines, which includes the introduction to the kinematics and dynamics of marine gear drives, elementary kinematic analysis of linkages by means of velocity diagrams and acceleration diagrams.
-Strength of materials, which discuss the stiffness relationship, Hooke's law, stress and strain, modulus; simple beam theory, second moment of area, bending stress; shear force and bending moment diagrams; torsional, combined and off-axis loading, principal stresses; introduction to stiffness and strain analysis; stress and strain in thin walled shells.

MNO1105 Engineering Mathematics

This module aims to provide the Stage 1 students mathematical knowledge and skills base for the various undergraduate engineering programmes in the faculty. This module begins with a review of methods of calculus including illustrations of such methods in engineering. These ideas are developed to enable a large range of engineering systems to be modelled using differential equations.

This module covers the topics such as functions, differentiation and integration; Exponential, logarithmic and hyperbolic funtions; Complex numbers, Cartesian and polar forms; Trigonometric functions and inverse functions; Partial differentiation; Techniques of integration and numerical integration; Applications; Basic types of first and second order ordinary differential equations.

 

MNO1106 Engineering Mathematics and Statistics

This module aims to provide the Stage 1 students mathematical knowledge and skills base for the various undergraduate engineering programmes in the faculty. Part 1 of this module begins with a review of methods of calculus including illustrations of such methods in engineering. It covers the topics such as analytical methods of solution; Linked systems; Matrix and vector algebra; Solution methods for systems of linear equations; and solving eigenvalue problems.

Part 2 of this module will aim to provide a basic understanding of statistical methods in the context of marine technology. It introduces students to basic, but crucial areas of statistics, and lays the foundation for future courses. This module covers area relating to probability, sampling, descriptive statistics, discrete distributions (binomial, Poisson), continuous distributions (uniform, normal, exponential, extreme value, Rayleigh). Random number generation. Linear combinations of variables, central limit theorem, confidence intervals for means, variances and proportions and for comparisons of these between samples. Regression. This module also teaches the students a statistical software, Minitab.

MNO1107 Marine Engineering IA

This module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of general introduction to marine engineering systems on board ships, familiarisation with the components of Marine engineering systems onboard a ship, and mathematical background to operation and analysis of engineering systems onboard ships.

This module covers both components of practice and science, which includes
1.Ships and Machinery: Types of propulsion engines, Main and Auxiliary Machinery arrangement
2.Marine Diesel Engines: Four stroke and two stroke cycles, Power measurement (indicated power, brake power, fuel power, efficiencies), Combustion equations, Stoichiometric air/fuel ratio calculation, Gas exchange process and pressure charging, Components of two and four stroke engines. Marine Engine Supporting Systems: Fuel system, lubricating oil system (including Cylinder oil lubrication), cooling systems and air starting system.
3.Boilers: Steam requirements, Boilers types, other boiler arrangements, boiler mountings, purity of boiler feed water, Boiler water treatment.
4.Definitions of basic parameters, properties, units, dimensions and energy groups.
5.Thermodynamics systems and control volumes: Closed and open systems.

MNO1108 Marine Engineering IB

This module covers both components of practice and science, which includes
1.The 1st law of thermodynamics: Non-and Steady flow energy equations
2.The 2nd law of thermodynamics: Entropy
3.Working fluid: State, process and cycles. Including Equation of State and Specific Heat Capacities for perfect gasses.
4.The heat engine cycles using a perfect gas: The Carnot cycle, the air standard cycles, thermodynamic cycle’s calculations.
5.Heat Engine Cycles using condensable fluids: Charts and tables for condensable fluid state properties, Steam cycles.

 

MNO1109 Naval Architecture IA

This modules consists of two parts, i.e. Part 1 on Principles of Naval Architecture and Part 2 on Technical Drawing.

Part 1 includes: Methods of numerical integration and quadrature; Calculation of hydrostatics based on areas, volumes and centroids; Metacentric theory and ship stability; Concepts of initial and static stability; Presentation of stability information; Evaluation of stability. This module covers knowledge relating to Archimedes principle, ship stability and fluid dynamics, such as –

i.Archimedes principles; establishing equilibrium; basic naval architectural terms and concepts; basic hydrostatic quantities; numerical interrogation, Simpsons First, Second and Third Rules; calculation of area first and second moments or area; calculation of volume and centroids; calculation of waterplane area, LCF, transverse and longitudinal second moment; calculation of displaced volume, KB and LCB; Metacentric theory and stability; calculation of metacentric radius; calculation of metacentric height and righting level; calculation of KG; influence of adding or removing mass; history of shipbuilding; introduction to offshore engineering and small craft technology.

ii.Ship stability; hydrostatic particulars, tabular and graphical presentation; calculation of centres of gravity; shift of centre of gravity due to adding, moving, or removing a mass; special cases; a suspended load, tanks and free surface effect; flooding calculations; added mass and lost buoyancy methods; longitudinal stability and trim; draught analysis; hogging and sagging, the layer correction; the inclining experiment; introduction to static stability, the Wall Sided formula, cross curves of stability, curves of static stability; stability evaluation; IMO criteria, the Stability Booklet.

Part 2 includes: Fundamental skills in technical drawing; Representation of components; Principles of dimensioning and dimensioning of components; Tolerances; Joint connections and ACAD drawing.

MNO1110 Naval Architecture IB

This modules aims to develop knowledge and understanding of physical properties of fluids and how they are modelled; the basic principles of hydrostatic and fluid dynamics; and the potential flow models and Newtonian fluids. This module covers knowledge relating to marine and offshore engineering technology, fundamental to ship production and linesplan drawing, Archimedes principle, ship stability and fluid dynamics, such as –

1)Shipbuilding technology; introduction to different ship designs, offshore engineering, small craft technology, very large floating structure and marine energy devices; ship production and sketching; launching and grounding

2)Ship damaged stability; flooding calculation, added mass and loss buoyancy methods;

3)Fluid dynamics; fluid properties, Newtonian fluids; hydrostatic - pressure, Archimedes Principle and buoyancy forces; Fluids in motion - laminar and turbulent flow; Quantifying fluid flow - continuity equation and volumetric flow rate; Simple flow models - ideal fluids and Bernoulli's equation; real fluids and energy losses; inviscid fluids and potential flow models. Introduction to Navier Stokes equations, both practice and science; Dimensional analysis

4)Ship production; sketches of ship components

5)Linesplan drawing

Year 2
MNO2101 Analytical Methods in Marine Technology

This module aims to cover Ordinary Differential Equations and Series: The Laplace transform and its applications. Numerical methods for solving differential equations. Taylor series in one and two variables. Fourier series. Stationary points of functions of two variables.  Vector algebra and applications. Scalar and vector fields: grad, div, curl. Line, surface and volume integrals. Divergence Theorem and applications in fluid dynamics.

MNO2102 Marine and Offshore Production Management

AIMS:
A1. To provide students with knowledge of the relationships between markets, products, production facilities and performance in the production of marine and offshore structures;
A2. To develop the understanding of the links between design and production.
A3. To enable students to start to plan and manage projects.
A4. To inform students about responsibility for and issues relating to health, safety and environment
A5. To provide students with knowledge of the ship & offshore repair and disposal & decommissioning sectors;
A6. To introduce students to advance production methods used for a range of marine and offshore structures.
A7. To give students practice in the application of the knowledge and tools and to improve employability of graduates in the marine and offshore industry.
                    
Outline of Syllabus:
1. The market for ships and offshore structures
2. The relationship between design and production.
3. Network planning and Project management.
4. Design for production facilities and shipyard layout.
5. Quality assurance, automation and cost reduction.
6. Productivity, progress and performance measurements.
7. Shipbuilding contract and its management.
8. Ship repair technology, coating and environmental issues.
9. Ship recycling and offshore decommissioning.
10.Health, safety, environment and energy management.    

 

MNO2103 Marine Engineering IIA

This module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of auxiliary systems relevant to both marine and offshore industry, scientific principles and subsequent application of marine thermal fluids and classification and regulatory requirements. Topics such as pumps and piping systems, bilge and ballast systems, anti-heeling system, heat exchangers, steering gear system, Liquefied Natural Gas cargo systems, Ice class rules applicable to ship systems, classification and regulatory requirements, thermal fluid and fluid flow theories will be covered. A practical laboratory session on heat exchanger is included.

MNO2104 Marine Engineering IIB

This course builds upon the fundamental principles of electrical engineering, with focus on the system design and applications in the marine industry.  It introduces the marine power plants, switchboard and distribution network design and calculation. Topics include power management system, cabling system, EMI/EMC considerations, lighting system, safety systems, marine navigation, communication, control and automation systems design onboard ship, process instrumentations, system interfacing, network integration techniques and classification and regulatory requirements. The course introduces current research works on marine electric propulsion and digital shipping technologies. Laboratory sessions will be included to allow the student to demonstrate the design of the electrical systems and analyse the simulations.  Student is also required to demonstrate the marine electrical knowledge via a project research, presentation and report.

MNO2105 Marine Structures IA

The module provides an awareness of structural principles and their application to marine related problems. Topics include: static equilibrium of ship hull girder, still water and wave loads on ships; calculation of load effects on ship hull girder, bending and shear stresses in ship hull girder, calculation of cross-sectional properties of ship buckling of columns, truss structures and statistical analysis of stress time series. Lectures and pre-class assignments focus on conceptual understanding and tutorials mainly aim at improving problem-solving skills. Assessment consists of a group coursework on global structural analysis and written examination covering all subjects of the module.

MNO2106 Marine Structures IB

The module is a continuation of MNO2105 - Marine Structures IA and focuces on analysis and design of structural members in ship and offshore structures, ship hull girder vibration and marine composite materials. Topics include: determinate and indeterminate beams, two-dimensional stress and strain analysis, strain measurement, sources of hull girder vibration, calculation of hull girder natural frequencies and vibration amplitudes and finally applications of composite materials in marine structures. Lectures and pre-class assignments focus on conceptual understanding and tutorials mainly aim at improving problem-solving skills. Assessment consists of a group coursework on design, make and test of a truss crane and written examination covering all subjects of the module.

MNO2107 Ship Resistance

The aims of this module is:
• To introduce physical phenomena, basic fluid mechanics and relevant theories of resistance;
• To introduce and explain numerical and experimental techniques used to estimate ship resistance;
• To show and explain how to adopt these methods for estimating the resistance in the preliminary design stage.

MNO2108 Marine Propulsion

The aims of this module is:
• To introduce physical phenomena, basic fluid mechanics and relevant theories of propulsion;
• To introduce and explain physical model testing and empirical methods used in relation to ship powering problem;
• To show and explain how to adopt these methods for performing basic propeller design in the preliminary design stage.

MNO2109 Introduction to Business Management

The module aims to:
-equip students with a basic knowledge of financial accounting, management accounting, finance and business law.
-ensure students understand the functions of their roles in businesses.
-provide students with the experience of going through the entire process of job search, from submitting their job application letter and resume to attending a mock job interview session.

1.Company law:  types of business, shareholders, directors, memorandum and articles of association
2.Contract law:  law of contract including sale of goods, law of negligence including product liability, dispute resolution in the UK and Singapore
3.Costing, management accounting and cash flow:  costing concepts, direct and indirect costs, break-even analysis, cost budgets, components of cash flow, managing cash and working capital
4.Sources of capital, investment appraisal:  equity, loan capital, banks and institutions, gearing, investment measures, capital investment, discounted cash flow
5.Financial accounting and company reporting:  profit and loss, balance sheet, assets and liabilities, shareholders' funds, double entry, funds flow, directors' and auditors' reports, going concern concept, relevance, historical cost and reliability concepts
6.Financial analysis - reading of financials of a listed company
In order to prepare students to secure their first IWSP position, this Career and Professional Development (CPD) module aims to provide students with the experience of going through the entire process of job search, from submitting their job application letter and resume to attending a mock job interview session. The knowledge and skills, acquired by students through this module and the IWSP, would form a valuable source for students to draw from as they look for their first full-time job upon graduation and as they plan their career.

 

MNO2111 Naval Architecture II

The aims of this module are:
• Develop an understanding of the implications of ship stability in design and operation.
• Introduce the concepts of dynamic stability in terms of case studies including relevant regulations.
• Develop understanding of the implications for very large angle stability.
• Illustrate real solutions of general arrangement and accommodation design for different types of vessels.

 

MNO2112 Marine Dynamics

The aims of this module are:
• To introduce the basic seakeeping qualities expected from a good ship and an offshore design.
• To provide knowledge underpinning the understanding of the factors influencing the seakeeping characteristics of ships and offshore structures.
• To develop skills required to predict the seakeeping behaviour of ships and offshore structures.
• Introduce the fundamental concepts of ship manoeuvring in calm, deep water including the form of the equations of motion, typical nomenclature and regulatory issues.
• Introduce the experimental methods used for obtaining motion derivatives and the post processing of obtained data including the derivation of semi-empirical methods.
• Introduce linear analysis for preliminary estimations of performance and operability.

Outline of Syllabus:                                    
Introduction to seakeeping; sea environment; regular waves and wave kinematics; added mass and hydrodynamic reaction forces of floating structures; wave excitation forces/moment acting on a floating structure; natural frequencies of a floating structure in heave, roll and pitch, uncoupled heaving motion of a floating structure; derivation and solution of motion response equations in regular waves; irregular seaway; forces and motion responses in an irregular seaway.
Standard manoeuvres:IMO Regulations. Manoeuvring criteria; equations of motion; Hydrodynamics forces and movements; Derivatives; Simple KT equations of motion; The nature of derivatives; Low aspects ratio wing analogy; Slender body theory; Directional stability and control; Turning ability; Ship characteristics.    

 

MNO3101 Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP)

The IWSP provides students with unique learning opportunities to achieve the following objectives:
a) Applied  learning  –  integration of theory and practice, acquisition  of specialist knowledge and development of professional skills.
b) Exposure to real-world conditions- appreciation of real-world constraints in respective industry contexts to develop skills of adaptability, creativity and innovation, while adding value to the work place.
c) Smooth transition to jobs-practical experience which shortens work induction period, translating to higher productivity and lower training costs to future employers of SIT’s graduates. The work experience acquired may also contribute to professional accreditation/certification requirements if applicable.
The IWSP is an integral part of applied learning as it provides an opportunity for students to integrate what they have learnt in the classroom to what is practiced in the real world, and vice-versa. The extended period of IWSP with students performing real work also provides an opportunity for companies to evaluate the suitability of students as potential employees. In effect, the IWSP is equivalent to the probation period. The student will also have ample opportunity to immerse in the industry’s business and culture and decide if this is a good industry to work in. Besides producing practice-oriented graduates, IWSP will also be the platform through which students will be challenged during their work attachment stint to initiate innovative projects under the guidance of SIT’s IWSP Supervisors and Company appointed Work Supervisors. Through such projects, students will have the opportunity to develop innovative solutions for the projects they have identified. In this way, the IWSP will be a key platform that contributes to the inculcation of the SIT-DNA in every student.

 

Year 3
MNO3101 Integrated Work Study Programme (IWSP)

The IWSP provides students with unique learning opportunities to achieve the following objectives:
a) Applied  learning  –  integration of theory and practice, acquisition  of specialist knowledge and development of professional skills.
b) Exposure to real-world conditions- appreciation of real-world constraints in respective industry contexts to develop skills of adaptability, creativity and innovation, while adding value to the work place.
c) Smooth transition to jobs-practical experience which shortens work induction period, translating to higher productivity and lower training costs to future employers of SIT’s graduates. The work experience acquired may also contribute to professional accreditation/certification requirements if applicable.
The IWSP is an integral part of applied learning as it provides an opportunity for students to integrate what they have learnt in the classroom to what is practiced in the real world, and vice-versa. The extended period of IWSP with students performing real work also provides an opportunity for companies to evaluate the suitability of students as potential employees. In effect, the IWSP is equivalent to the probation period. The student will also have ample opportunity to immerse in the industry’s business and culture and decide if this is a good industry to work in. Besides producing practice-oriented graduates, IWSP will also be the platform through which students will be challenged during their work attachment stint to initiate innovative projects under the guidance of SIT’s IWSP Supervisors and Company appointed Work Supervisors. Through such projects, students will have the opportunity to develop innovative solutions for the projects they have identified. In this way, the IWSP will be a key platform that contributes to the inculcation of the SIT-DNA in every student.

 

MNO3103 Marine Transport Business

AIMS:    
A1 - Understand the Marine Transport market and the role of the marine technologists in it.
A2 - Identify the international factors that result in seaborne trade.
A3 - Show how ships are operated to fulfil that demand.
A4 - Emphasise the need for efficient operation.                                                                    
Outline of Syllabus:                                    
The module provides an understanding of the marine transport market and the role of marine technologists in it.
Topics include: world trade; freight markets and demand for ships; major bulk commodities; general cargo and liner trade; freight rates and operating economics; service performance of ships; Choice of ship types; service performance of ships; ports.            

 

MNO3104 Drilling Engineering

This module aims to
A1- To introduce the basic engineering principles of drilling for hydrocarbons on and offshore locations.
A2- To provide knowledge of drilling systems.
A3- To develop skills in order to design a drill string and to practice the power requirements for hoisting systems and the circulation of drilling fluid.
Topics include: geology and hydrocarbons, history of oil well drilling, the drilling rig, hoisting, drill string design, drill bits, rig hydraulics, straight hole drilling, directional drilling (including slant and horizontal drilling), fracture gradient, casing design, cementing, blow out control, offshore drilling and recent developments.

MNO3107 Marine Structures II

The module increases the awareness of structural behaviour and develops advanced structural and material concepts.
Topics include: matrix stiffness method, effect of shear stress in asymmetric beam sections, torsion of beams, plastic collapse of beams and grillages, fundamentals of fracture mechanics, fatigue of marine structures. Lectures and pre-class assignments focus on conceptual understanding and tutorials mainly aim at improving problem-solving skills. Assessment consists of three pieces of individual coursework and written examination covering all subjects of the module.

MNO3108 Advanced Resistance and Propulsion

The aims of this module is to introduce
• Physical phenomenon and associated hydrodynamic theory relating to advanced hull and propeller flow and hence resulting ship resistance and propulsion;
• Hydrodynamic design of a conventional ship hull form with specific emphasis on its forebody and afterbody sections

MNO3109 Advanced Ship and Offshore Hydrodynamics

The aims of this Module are:                                    
A1 - To build on the knowledge and skills derived from MAR2101; Marine Dynamics so they can be applied in the advanced field of ship and offshore hydrodynamics.
A2 - Physical phenomena, associated fluid mechanics and the relevant theory focused on separate flows.
A3 - A ship with speed in waves; absolute vs. encountering frequency; uncoupled rolling and pitching motions
A4 - Physical phenomena and analytical approaches to wave diffraction by large volume bottom fixed offshore structures.
A5 - Methods for estimating the fluid loading and response of slender structural elements used in offshore.
A6 - To provide knowledge of experimental methods and techniques adopted by offshore engineers and naval architects in the area of fluid loading and response.
A7 - To develop skills required to predict the functional performance and downtime for offshore    vessels and installations.    

Outline of Syllabus:
                            
The module applies the fundamental marine dynamic principles to ships and various different types of platform concept in order to assess the environmental loafing and response. Topics include: prediction of environmental loads on fixed and floating offshore platforms; shallow and deep water wave theories; dynamic responses analysis and experimental techniques, dynamic modelling of offshore floating structures in waves; fluid loading on slender offshore structures; Froude Krylov forces; simplified diffraction forces; introduction to the Morison equation – fluid phenomenon and force coefficients, variations on the basic formula, fluid loading calculations; statistical description of random seas; two-dimensional and three-dimensional wave spectra; statistical description of response to environmental loading; downtime analysis; experimental facilities and their use including: wave basins, U-tube oscillating water tunnels, wind/wave/current facilities, towing tank and cavitation tunnels.

The module also provides an insight and understanding concerning the separated fluid flows related to the fluid loading of slender bodies, such as structural elements of fixed platforms and pipelines. Modelling aspects of ships and offshore structures in incompressible viscid/inviscid flow. Topics also include: fluid flow phenomena; relevant potential flow models; uni-directional flows - flow separation, vortex shedding; vortex induced vibration (VIV); Real oscillatory flows - the concept of added mass wave diffraction by large volume structures- McCamy and Fuchs solution.           

MNO3112 Ship Design

The aims of this module are:
A1 - The design process as applied to ships;
A2 - The multi-disciplinary nature of the ship design process;
A3 - The ship design problem and contemporary influences on ship design;
A4 - Ship design methods for deadweight, capacity linear and rule ships;
A5 - Design considerations related to the type of cargo and operation of the vessel;
A6 - Hull form design and hydrodynamic optimisation for sustainable operation;
A7 - The synthesis of a ship design solution.

MNO3114 Capstone Project and Report

The aims of the module are to independently formulate, undertake and report on a substantial design or research project and to carry out an independent piece of technical investigation involving project integration, design and/or some research methods. The students are required work individually on a chosen topic relevant to marine technology and plan, manage and undertake under supervision by an academic member of staff. The assessment is based on a literature review report, final report in format of scientific journal article and reflective log together with support materials.

Campus Location
SIT@Dover
SIT@Dover

10 Dover Drive
Singapore 138683

SIT@Dover
SIT@NP Building

Ngee Ann Polytechnic
537 Clementi Road, Singapore 599493