Engineering

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW
University of Glasgow

Bachelor of Engineering with Honours in Mechatronics

Mechatronics is a fusion of mechanical, electrical, electronic and control engineering. This multidisciplinary field is increasingly integral to the engineering process as innovation demands the integration of mechanics and electronics. For example, a car may now contain a hundred processor chips and rely on sensors, software and actuators to control everything from braking to entertainment. A mechatronics engineer unites the principles of mechanics, electronics, and computing to generate simpler, more economical and reliable systems.

This degree programme will allow students to integrate Electrical/Electronic and Mechanical Engineering in the study of cutting-edge and high-tech industrial components and systems. This interdisciplinary approach allows students to successfully combine traditionally divided disciplines, equipping them for varied career opportunities.

Mechatronics Engineers excel in their work on hybrid systems in varied fields of research such as production systems, synergy drives, planetary exploration rovers, automotive subsystems such as anti-lock braking systems and spin-assist, and everyday equipment such as autofocus cameras, video, hard disks, and CD players.

Learn about SIT-UofG’s Bachelor of Engineering with Honours in Mechatronics.

University of Glasgow Academic Calendar AY2016/17

Academic Calendar AY2016/17

Start of Bridging Modules

29 Aug 2016

Start of Academic Year

12 Sep 2016

Start of Semester 1

19 Sep 2016

Revision and Examination*

5 Dec 2016 – 16 Dec 2016

End of Semester 1

16 Dec 2016

Christmas Break

19 Dec 2016 – 6 Jan 2017

Start of Semester 2

9 Jan 2017

Spring Break

27 Mar 2017 – 14 Apr 2017

Start of Revision

17 Apr 2017

Examination

24 Apr 2017 – 19 May 2017

End of Semester 2

26 May 2017

Examination Resits

31 Jul 2017 – 18 Aug 2017

End of Academic Year

8 Sep 2017

Note: Dates are provisional and subjected to change.

*Computing Science has exams in Semester 2 only.

 

University of Glasgow Academic Calendar AY2015/16

Academic Calendar AY2015/16

Start of Bridging Modules

31 Aug 2015

Start of Academic Year

14 Sep 2015

Start of Semester 1

21 Sep 2015

Revision and Examination*

7 Dec 2015 – 18 Dec 2015

End of Semester 1

18 Dec 2015

Christmas Break

21 Dec 2015 – 8 Jan 2016

Start of Semester 2

11 Jan 2016

Spring Break

28 Mar 2016 – 15 Apr 2016

Start of Revision

18 Apr 2016

Examination

25 Apr 2016 – 20 May 2016

End of Semester 2

27 May 2016

Examination Resits

1 Aug 2016 - 19 Aug 2016

End of Academic Year

9 Sep 2016

*Computing Science has exams in Semester 2 only.

 

Academic Calendar AY2016/17

Start of Bridging Modules

29 Aug 2016

Start of Academic Year

12 Sep 2016

Start of Semester 1

19 Sep 2016

Revision and Examination*

5 Dec 2016 – 16 Dec 2016

End of Semester 1

16 Dec 2016

Christmas Break

19 Dec 2016 – 6 Jan 2017

Start of Semester 2

9 Jan 2017

Spring Break

27 Mar 2017 – 14 Apr 2017

Start of Revision

17 Apr 2017

Examination

24 Apr 2017 – 19 May 2017

End of Semester 2

26 May 2017

Examination Resits

31 Jul 2017 – 18 Aug 2017

End of Academic Year

8 Sep 2017

Note: Dates are provisional and subjected to change.

*Computing Science has exams in Semester 2 only.

 

University of Glasgow Academic Calendar AY2014/15

Academic Calendar AY2014/15

Start of bridging modules

1 Sep 2014

Start of Academic Year

15 Sep 2014

Start of Semester 1

(for Aeronautical Engineering, Aerospace Systems, Mechanical Design Engineering, Mechatronics)

22 Sep 2014

Start of Semester 1

(for Computing Science)

29 Sep 2014

Revision and Examination*

8 Dec 2014 – 19 Dec 2014

End of Semester 1

19 Dec 2014

Christmas Break

22 Dec 2014 – 9 Jan 2015

Start of Semester 2

12 Jan 2015

Spring Break

30 Mar 2015 – 17 Apr 2015

Start of Revision

20 Apr 2015

Examination

27 Apr 2015 – 22 May 2015

End of Semester 2

29 May 2015

Examination Resits

3 Aug 2015 - 21 Aug 2015

End of Academic Year

11 Sep 2015

*Computing Science has exams in Semester 2 only.

 

Academic Calendar AY2015/16

Start of Academic Year

14 Sep 2015

Start of Semester 1

21 Sep 2015

Revision and Examination*

7 Dec 2015 – 18 Dec 2015

End of Semester 1

18 Dec 2015

Christmas Break

21 Dec 2015 – 8 Jan 2016

Start of Semester 2

11 Jan 2016

Spring Break

28 Mar 2016 – 15 Apr 2016

Start of Revision

18 Apr 2016

Examination

25 Apr 2016 – 20 May 2016

End of Semester 2

27 May 2016

Examination Resits

1 Aug 2016 - 19 Aug 2016

End of Academic Year

9 Sep 2016

*Computing Science has exams in Semester 2 only.

 

University of Glasgow Academic Calendar AY2013/14

Academic Calendar AY2013/14

Start of bridging modules for:
• Aeronautical Engineering
• Aerospace Systems
• Computer Science

2 Sep 2013

Start of bridging modules for:
• Mechanical Design Engineering
• Mechatronics

9 Sep 2013

Start of Prep Week

16 Sep 2013

Start of Classes

23 Sep 2013

Revision and Examination*

9 Dec 2013 – 20 Dec 2013

End of Semester 1

20 Dec 2013

Break

23 Dec 2013 – 10 Jan 2014

Start of Classes

13 Jan 2014

Break

31 Mar 2014 – 18 Apr 2014

Start of Revision

21 Apr 2014

Examination

28 Apr 2014 – 23 May 2014

End of Semester 2

30 May 2014

*Computing Science has exams in Semester 2 only.

 

Academic Calendar AY2014/15

Start of bridging modules

1 Sep 2014

Start of Academic Year

15 Sep 2014

Start of Semester 1

22 Sep 2014

Revision and Examination*

8 Dec 2014 – 19 Dec 2014

End of Semester 1

19 Dec 2014

Christmas Break

22 Dec 2014 – 9 Jan 2015

Start of Semester 2

12 Jan 2015

Spring Break

30 Mar 2015 – 17 Apr 2015

Start of Revision

20 Apr 2015

Examination

27 Apr 2015 – 22 May 2015

End of Semester 2

29 May 2015

Examination Resits

3 Aug 2015 - 21 Aug 2015

End of Academic Year

11 Sep 2015

*Computing Science has exams in Semester 2 only.

 

Grading System

University of Glasgow

  • Bachelor of Engineering with Honours in:

    • Aeronautical Engineering

    • Aerospace Systems

    • Mechanical Design Engineering

    • Mechatronics

  • Bachelor of Science with Honours in Computing Science

Assessment is governed by the University’s Code of Assessment, which is part of the University Calendar (the formal regulations). A full explanation is provided here. This specifies a set of grades from A1 (highest) to H (lowest) with descriptions of each grade shown in the table below. Some courses, notably projects, are assessed using these grades directly but most examinations in Engineering are marked in percentages. The School converts these to grades using the mapping in the table as a guide but this may be varied.

Mapping of percentage marks to grades and verbal descriptors of grades from Code of Assessment

Grade Aggregate Score %
(*BEng Programmes)
%
(**BSc Programme)
Gloss Primary verbal descriptors for attainment of Intended Learning Outcomes
A 1 22 84-100 91-100 Excellent Exemplary range and depth of attainment of intended learning outcomes, secured by discriminating command of a comprehensive range of relevant materials and analyses, and by deployment of considered judgement relating to key issues, concepts and procedures
2 21 80-83 84-90
3 20 77-79 78-83
4 19 74-76 73-77
5 18 70-73 70-72
B 1 17 67-69 67-69 Very Good Conclusive attainment of virtually all intended learning outcomes, clearly grounded on a close familiarity with a wide range of supporting evidence, constructively utilised to reveal appreciable depth of understanding
2 16 64-66 63-66
3 15 60-63 60-62
C 1 14 57-59 57-59 Good Clear attainment of most of the intended learning outcomes, some more securely grasped than others, resting on a circumscribed range of evidence and displaying a variable depth of understanding
2 13 54-56 53-56
3 12 50-53 50-52
D 1 11 47-49 47-49 Satisfactory Acceptable attainment of intended learning outcomes, displaying a qualified familiarity with a minimally sufficient range of relevant materials, and a grasp of the analytical issues and concepts which is generally reasonable, albeit insecure
2 10 44-46 43-46
3 9 40-43 40-42
E 1 8 37-39 37-39 Weak Attainment deficient in respect of specific intended learning outcomes, with mixed evidence as to the depth of knowledge and weak deployment of arguments or deficient manipulations
2 7 34-36 33-36
3 6 30-33 30-32
F 1 5 27-29 27-29 Poor Attainment of intended learning outcomes appreciably deficient in critical respects, lacking secure basis in relevant factual and analytical dimensions
2 4 24-26 23-26
3 3 20-23 20-22
G 1 2 15-19 15-19 Very Poor Attainment of intended learning outcomes markedly deficient in respect of nearly all intended learning outcomes, with irrelevant use of materials and incomplete and flawed explanation
2 1 10-14 10-14
H 0 0 0-9 0-9 No convincing evidence of attainment of intended learning outcomes, such treatment of the subject as is in evidence being directionless and fragmentary

*BEng refers to Bachelor of Engineering programmes
**BSc refers to Bachelor of Science programme

In order to be awarded the credits and to gain one of the grades in the table, the student must have completed a course satisfactorily. If the student has not been awarded the credits for a variety of reasons other results are used.

For example:

  • MV means that the student had medical or personal circumstances which prevented them from taking the exam at first sitting and students can take the resit without penalty.
  • CW means that the student has not completed some part of the assessment (exam, laboratory report etc) but can still do so before the next academic year. Contact the lecturer if in doubt as to what needs to be done.
  • CR means that the student has not completed some compulsory element of the course (attended laboratories etc) and it is not possible to remedy this in the current academic year. Students cannot change CR by taking a resit exam and would need to repeat the course and the progress committee may not permit this. Contact the lecturer if in doubt as to why the student was refused credit for a course.
  • 07 means a deferred result – The University was not able to give the student a grade at the usual time. The reasons range from study abroad to plagiarism so please ask if this is unexpected.
  • ZZ means that the student is a debtor. The student cannot see their results until the debt has been cleared.


Each grade also has an aggregation score on a scale from 0–22. These are used to calculate the student's average performance, which is needed to check the student's progress and for graduation. (There was formerly a 0–16 scale as well but it is no longer used.)

Please note that there is no resit available for Year 2 (Level 4) courses, such as Control 4N or Software Engineering 3N for BEng in Mechanical Design Engineering.


Rules for Progression and Honours Assessment

The student's results at the end of each academic year must meet certain requirements for the student to progress through the degree programme. There are similar requirements for graduation. These are set out formally in the University Calendar. The following is a brief, unofficial summary.

Progression (BEng Programmes)

For progression from Year 1 (Level 3) to Year 2 (Level 4) in BEng, the student's Year 1 results excluding the courses undertaken in Glasgow during OIP must satisfy these conditions:

  • successful completion of 120 credits with a minimum grade of E3 in every course (130 credits for Aerospace programmes)
  • minimum grade of D3 in the best 110 credits
  • GPA of at least 9.0 (i.e., D3) on the 0–22 scale

The student may resit courses in Year 1 to meet the progression rules. The grade points are capped at 9, corresponding to D3, and only the student's results from the first attempt in Year 1 will be carried forward to the student's degree classification.

The School Progress Committee meets in June and September to consider the progress of all students. They consider the student's results with any evidence of personal difficulties and decide whether the student:

  • can make normal progress to the next year of study
  • are offered the opportunity to repeat some courses in order to improve the student's results; there is no automatic right to any further reassessment beyond the first resit
  • should be excluded from further study, in which case the committee will consider whether the student's results meet the standard for an exit award.

Note that Applicable Mathematics 2N, 2S and 3S are included in the progression requirements but not in the degree classification. The courses undertaken in Glasgow during the OIP are included in the calculation of the Year 1 GPA used for the student's degree classificaiton.

Progression (BSc Programme)

For progression from Year 1 (Level 3) to Year 2 (Level 4) in the BSc, the student's Year 1 results must satisfy these conditions:

  • successful completion of 120 credits
  • an aggregate score of D3, (i.e. 9 on the University 22 point scale) in Year 1 (Level 3), at the first attempt.

The student may resit courses in Year 1 to meet the progression rules or prerequisites for Year 2 (level 4) courses.

The purpose of progress regulations is to stop the student from wasting time (and money) by studying for a degree that the student is unlikely to achieve.

Honours Assessment

Honours GPA Honours classification
18.0 – 22.0 First class
17.1 – 17.9 Either first or upper second class (discretion)
15.0 – 17.0 Upper second class
14.1 – 14.9 Either upper second or lower second class (discretion)
12.0 – 14.0 Lower second class
11.1 – 11.9 Either lower second or third class (discretion)
9.0 – 11.0 Third class
8.1 – 8.9 Either third class or fail (discretion)
0.0 – 8.0 Fail

Graduation Information for BEng Programmes

The University has general requirements for graduation and BEng has extra rules that are similar to those for progression. To successfully complete Year 2 (Level 4) in BEng, the student must satisfy these conditions at the first assessment:

  • successful completion of 120 credits with a minimum grade of E3 in every course
  • minimum grade of D3 in the best 100 credits
  • average GPA of at least 9.0 (i.e., D3) on the 0–22 scale
  • grade D3 or better in Individual Project work

These rules are set by the Engineering Council for accredited degrees. The student will be considered for the degree of BSc (Honours) in Engineering, which is not accredited, if the student meets the university’s standard requirements but not the extra rules. Note that the student requires a minimum grade of D3 in the student's major individual project for any honours degree and that reassessment is not permitted in year 2 (level 4).

The student's degree classification is calculated from a weighted average of results from Year 1 (Level 3) and Year 2 (Level 4) weighted 30/70.

Graduation Information for BSc Programme

The University has general requirements for graduation and the BSc has extra rules that are similar to those for progression. Year 2 (Level 4) has nine courses, and an individual project that counts for three courses. To successfully complete Year 2 (Level 4) in the BSc, the student must satisfy these conditions at the first assessment:

  • An average grade of at least 9.0 (i.e. D3) on the 0-22 scale
  • successful completion of 120 credits
  • A grade of at least D3 on the level 4 individual project

The student's degree classification is calculated from a weighted average of results from Year 1 (Level 3) and Year 2 (Level 4) weighted 40/60.

MODULE SYNOPSIS

University of Glasgow
Mechatronics, BEng (Hons)

Programme Structure

Year 1

• SIT2002 - Applicable Mathematics 2N

Mathematical techniques required in the degree programmes taught in collaboration with the Singapore Institute of Technology. The main topics include calculus of several variables, differential equations, Fourier series and Laplace transforms.

• SIT2004 - Power Electronics 2N

To understand the function, design, and characteristics of electrical and electronic components and sub-systems within the wider context of mechanical and aerospace products and systems. A major application is electronic drives for motors and actuators.

• SIT3004 - Dynamics and Control 3N

Dynamics: gives the student a thorough grounding in the modelling of mechanical systems, the solution of the resulting differential equations and the application to simple vibration problems. Control: understand and analyse simple feedback control systems.

• SIT3005 - Electronic System Design 3N

Introduction to specification driven design of analogue systems. Topics covered are low frequency precision design, design of ground and differential signals and low noise design.

• SIT3006 - Engineering Design 3N

To develop the students understanding of: Availability, Reliability, and Maintainability thereby enhancing the students' ability to evaluate design proposals from a number of related viewpoints. To illustrate and develop an understanding of robust design from functional performance and manufacture viewpoints. To expose students to the discipline involved in researching a technical area and producing a report and presentation.

• SIT3009 - Mathematical Modelling and Simulation 3N

To provide an introduction to the mathematical modelling of engineering systems and the uses to which they can be put. These include simulation, analysis and design. The use of computers to achieve this will be discussed as will generic issues relating to the use of computers for solution of mathematical problems.

• SIT3010 - Mechanics of Materials and Structures 3N

To equip students to perform deformation analyses of linear elastic skeletal structures by mathematical modelling and appropriate manual and computational methods, in particular, finite element analysis (FEA).

• SIT3011 - Mechatronics Team Project 3G

Students are divided into teams of about 4-6 that design and construct a mechatronic system to perform assigned tasks, on time and within budget. Typically the system is based on a wheeled robot chassis. It requires the selection and implementation of sensors and actuators, design of electronic hardware including printed circuit boards, and programming a digital control system. The project changes every year. Singapore students undertake this course during a four week study period at the University of Glasgow.

• SIT3013 - Software Engineering 3N

Understand the nature and problems of software and the need for software engineering. Develop familiarity with selected software engineering processes and techniques. Explore the relationship between software engineering and more traditional engineering disciplines

• SIT3024 - Instrumentation and Data Systems 3N

This course provides an introduction to instrumentation and data systems for engineers covering error analysis, signal acquisition and processing.

• SIT3012 - Real Time Computer Systems 3N

Hardware and software of computer systems which receive inputs from the physical world outside the computer and which must respond within the deadlines imposed by the time constants of the external hardware. The problems of multitasking, which arise when such systems have to respond to several simultaneous external events, are also introduced.

Year 2

• SIT4001 - Autonomous Vehicle Guidance Systems 4N

This course introduces the concepts behind autonomous vehicle guidance and coordination and enables students to design and implement guidance strategies for vehicles incorporating planning, optimising and reacting elements.

• SIT4003 - Control 4N

Applies classical control theory to a range of different types of system. It includes the classic types of controller such as proportional–integral–differential (PID), simple compensators and the use of Nyquist and Bode plots. The state space representation is introduced and used to assess stability.

• SIT4004 - Electronic System Design 4N

This course addresses the mixed-signal aspects of modern electronic systems. It includes the theory of sampling for analogue to digital conversion, which leads into an introduction to digital signal processing. It also covers analogue filters and digital to analogue conversion.

• SIT4007P - Project 4N

The individual project is an extended piece of work that provides the opportunity to show enthusiasm and initiative in attaining a specified goal. It is designed to develop the student’s ability to understand the field of the investigation, to select and justify the methodology adopted, to apply the methodology, to represent their results or findings accurately, and to understand and present the significance of the results or findings. In the case of the MDE project, this will be mechanical design and manufacture driven, following a generic design process. In the case of MT, it includes software, simulations, and often some form of mechanical or process application.

• SIT4008 - Robotics 4N

To provide an introduction to robots. Introduce the types of sensors and actuators that are commonly used in robotics. Develop an appreciation of the application issues concerning sensors and actuators within the context of robot applications. Develop the mathematics required to locate the position of a robot head and use this to plan and control its trajectory.

• SIT5001 - Professional Practice 5N

Introduces the concepts of entrepreneurial planning through understanding and practice in the use of developing a business plan.

ELIGIBILITY

University of Glasgow
Mechatronics, BEng (Hons)

Polytechnic Diploma

Nanyang Polytechnic

  • Aeronautical & Aerospace Technology
  • Aerospace Systems & Management
  • Digital & Precision Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering with Eco-Design
  • Electronics, Computer & Communications Engineering
  • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Mechatronics Engineering
  • Telematics & Media Technology

Ngee Ann Polytechnic

  • Aerospace Electronics
  • Aerospace Technology
  • Automation & Mechatronic Systems
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Clean Energy Management
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Electronic & Computer Engineering
  • Electronics & Telecommunications Engineering
  • Engineering Science
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechatronic Engineering

Republic Polytechnic

  • Aerospace Avionics
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Biomedical Electronics
  • Civil Aviation
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Renewable Energy Engineering

Singapore Polytechnic

  • Aeronautical Engineering
  • Aerospace Electronics
  • Bioelectronics
  • Bioengineering
  • Clean Energy
  • Computer Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Electrical & Electronic Engineering
  • Electronics & Communication Engineering
  • Electronics, Computer & Communication Engineering
  • Engineering with Business
  • Engineering Systems
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechatronics
  • Mechatronics and Robotics

Temasek Polytechnic

  • Aerospace Electronics
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Biomedical Informatics & Engineering
  • Clean Energy
  • Computer Engineering
  • Electrical & Electronic Engineering
  • Electronics
  • Intelligent Building Technology
  • Mechatronics
  • Mechatronics/Aerospace Engineering
  • Microelectronics

Other relevant diplomas not listed will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

OIP

University of Glasgow
Mechatronics, BEng (Hons)

Students studying in the University of Glasgow (UofG) degree programmes are required to complete a four-week attachment in Glasgow at the home campus of the University of Glasgow, U.K., where they will undertake a 10-credit group design/practical module, experience a different culture and interact with students there. Some industrial visits and guest lectures may be organised by the University of Glasgow. The estimated cost ranges from S$4,500* to S$5,500*.

Note: Estimated costs are dependent on the prevailing currency exchange rate and flight ticket prices.

mech

Mechatronics students working on a guided group project in a laboratory of the University of Glasgow, UK.
(Photo courtesy of Dr Patrick Chua)

design

Mechanical Design Engineering students working on a guided group project in a laboratory of the University of Glasgow, UK.
(Photo courtesy of Yvonne Chan)

group
Say “cheese” and “wish you were here!”
(Photo courtesy of Dr Patrick Chua)

“OIP is an eye-opener for me as I have not been exposed to other culture and ways of life. It is a good experience to be able to work with current students in Glasgow and sharing knowledge” -- Randall Tan, Mechatronics

“It was an unforgettable and eye-opening experience to see the lovely culture of Glasgow; the friendly people and slower pace of life. I was also in awe of the serenity and breath taking beauty of Scotland. It will be forever etched in my mind.” -- Ziyi Poh, Mechanical Design Engineering

“Sharing the summer of 2012 in Glasgow was definitely the highlight of the year. Being in a land where the sun rises at 4am and sets at 10pm, I was amazed by what Glasgow had to offer. The University, too, was a sight to behold, with its exterior representing a castle as though carved out from the movies. I am very proud to be a student of the University, and words just cannot describe how fortunate I was to have had this experience.’ – Khairul Anwar Bin Ahmad Samson, Mechatronics

 

CONTACT US / LOCATION

University of Glasgow
Mechatronics, BEng (Hons)

For admission-related queries, please email to Adm@SingaporeTech.edu.sg
For general and programme-related queries, please email to AcdPrg@SingaporeTech.edu.sg


drpatrickchua

Associate Professor Patrick Chua
Programme Director

dralfredtan

Assistant Professor Alfred Tan
Deputy Programme Director

chan siew chyun yvonne

Ms Yvonne Chan
Manager, Academic Programmes

Location:

SIT@NP Building
537 Clementi Road
Singapore 599493

location_np